Moving/2169 Mission/Windows

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This is what I found on my close inspection of the windows at 2169 Mission. I approached this with an eye towards what we can do to improve the current state, what we might want to include as a rider to our lease to have the landlord fix and what it is going to be like to live with these.


Contents

[edit] What to expect

[edit] Landlord Fix

First, since it's good to have handy, what we should hit up the landlord to fix:

  • The glass in the sliding door to the fire escape is not only not to code, but quite dangerous. The whole thing wobbles if you even bump against it. Someone will injure themselves when (not if) the glass breaks. This glass needs to be replaced with heavy, tempered glass suitable for glass doors, and should be done before we take occupancy.
  • The window in front next to the glass door is broken and needs to be replaced. Tape is not a suitable repair for glass.

[edit] Fix ourselves

What we probably should do upon taking possession or have the landlord do:

  • Almost none of the windows have been caulked at all. A small bead run all the way around the outside will keep them from leaking in.
  • many of the windows have mold on them. For health reasons, this should be removed. I believe there's some California law surrounding mold

[edit] Live with it

What we will probably expect to live with: These are the cheapest windows you can get. They're uninsulated single pane aluminum frame windows. This means a number of things:

  • They will sweat when there is any temperature differential or humidity. This causing mold to grow on them and is pretty inescapable.
  • They provide very little sound or temperature insulation from the outside world.
    • If we get loud, closing the windows won't help much.
    • Although no wind will be blowing through (convection), if it's hot on one side of the window, it'll be equally hot on the other side (conduction).


[edit] Technical Details

[edit] Back of building

  • There are a total of 9 windows on the back of the building. All open.
  • I could not identify any latches on these windows.
  • All windows are 3' x 5', with an additional 3' x 1.5' non-opening dormer, with the exception of the bath window where the dormer has been replaced by a vent to the second bathroom.
  • The bathroom window has a double pane of frosted glass. The frame is not caulked.
  • The frame for the first 2 windows outside the bathroom are caulked on the outside. No others are.
  • All windows in the back of the building have their original frames. There is some indication of past rot on the second one outside the bath. It appears to have been prior to the replacement of the original windows.


[edit] Front of building

  • There are 4 windows and 1 sliding glass door on the front of the building. 3 open.
  • These windows are 5' wide.
  • Windows that open have a lower portion that's 2.5' tall that does not open.
  • The upper portion of the window opens (It's probably safer that way with better air flow.) It is appx 5' square.
  • The center 2 windows have latches.
  • The third from the sliding door is caulked. No others are.
  • The window closest to the sliding door has a crack the width of it. The glass being held by clear packing tape.
  • The cracked window does not open. It is not one of the aluminum frame windows. It is recommended that the landlords replace it with an aluminum frame window so that i also can be opened.
  • There's a chip out of the second window from the door.
  • All the windows have paint on the lower half. On the outside. I'd recommend removing this with razor blades.
  • The sliding door is caulked and sealed, but should really just be replaced.
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