Editing Susan Lamp PRO

Jump to: navigation, search

Warning: You are not logged in. Your IP address will be publicly visible if you make any edits. If you log in or create an account, your edits will be attributed to your username, along with other benefits.

The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit.
Latest revision Your text
Line 1: Line 1:
 
400 Watt Metal Halide equivalent replacement, 234 LED Array @ 156 Watts
 
400 Watt Metal Halide equivalent replacement, 234 LED Array @ 156 Watts
  
Teh "Susan" Lamp series developed by Lunera launched their first generation lights around 2014. These lights bost a 50%+ efficency improvement over Metal Halide with an output of around 15,000 lumens.
+
Teh "Susan" Lamp series developed by Lunera launched there first generation lights around 2014. These lights bost a 50%+ efficency improvement over Metal Halide with an output of around 15,000 lumens.
  
 
In particular the focus here is on the '''SN-VP-E39-400W-4000-G1''', there are also "250W" and "175W" lights in the first gen series.
 
In particular the focus here is on the '''SN-VP-E39-400W-4000-G1''', there are also "250W" and "175W" lights in the first gen series.
Line 57: Line 57:
 
== Power Profiling ==
 
== Power Profiling ==
  
The following is from a power test of the lamp using a large high current 120VAC rheostat to slowly ramp up the voltage and evaluate the current draw. Note that LEDs respond somewhat exponentially to voltage adjustments, and a current limited source is the proper way to power these, however this provides valuable information for the design parameters of such an application.
+
The following is from a power test of the lamp using a large high current 120VAC rheostat to slowly ramp up the voltage and evaluate the current draw. Not that LEDs respond somewhat exponentially to voltage adjustments, and a current limited source is the proper way to power these, however these provides valuable information for the design parameters of such an application.
  
Orange meter is total Current into Schottky Diodes to LEDs
+
Orange meter is total AC Current to LEDs
  
Yellow meter is RMS AC Voltage into Schottky Diodes to LEDs
+
Yellow meter is RMS AC Voltage to LEDs
  
 
Blue meter is total Wattage INCLUDING losses from rheostat
 
Blue meter is total Wattage INCLUDING losses from rheostat
Line 67: Line 67:
 
Actually LED wattage consumption can be calculated by Amps * Volts
 
Actually LED wattage consumption can be calculated by Amps * Volts
  
Note that volts shown are AC, and feed into a Diode bridge, which generates a 4 Volt drop and rectifies to a DC voltage. So the actual power being consumed by the LEDs is:<br/>
+
Note that volts shown are AC, and feed into a Diode bridge, which generates a 4 Volt drop and rectifies to a DC voltage. So the actual power being consumed by the LEDs is (AC Voltage - 4) * Amps == Watts delivered to LEDs.
'''(AC Voltage - 4) * Amps = Watts'''
 
  
  
'''Measured AC Voltage & Current'''
+
Measured AC Voltage & Current
 
<pre>
 
<pre>
 
Test  Volts  Amps  Watts
 
Test  Volts  Amps  Watts
Line 81: Line 80:
  
  
'''Calculated DC Voltage & Current'''
+
Calculated DC Voltage & Current
 
<pre>
 
<pre>
 
Test  Volts  Amps  Watts
 
Test  Volts  Amps  Watts

Please note that all contributions to Noisebridge are considered to be released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (see Noisebridge:Copyrights for details). If you do not want your writing to be edited mercilessly and redistributed at will, then do not submit it here.
You are also promising us that you wrote this yourself, or copied it from a public domain or similar free resource. Do not submit copyrighted work without permission!

To protect the wiki against automated edit spam, we kindly ask you to solve the following CAPTCHA:

Cancel Editing help (opens in new window)