Talk:Chemistry

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- the current stove exhaust may (piping material is unknown) have issues depending on what types of fumes are sent up it, however it is located already relatively close to the fish bowl space and does run up to the roof and outside
 
- the current stove exhaust may (piping material is unknown) have issues depending on what types of fumes are sent up it, however it is located already relatively close to the fish bowl space and does run up to the roof and outside
 
+
* We're definitely going to need to build a fume hood. ANY reaction that evolves gas must be done with appropriate ventilation, even if it's a relatively harmless gas, and the vent over your average stove won't cut it. (I almost killed myself with carbon dioxide in my kitchen once, so I take this very seriously.) It would really be best if we built a fume hood with an air foil. I have a doc with instructions on how to build one, but it's scanned from a textbook so I really shouldn't upload it here. How much linear space is available near the existing exhaust vent? [[User:Mlp|Mlp]] 16:33, 1 October 2008 (PDT)
 
- what safety items should be present? (type of fire extinguisher, gloves, materials for cleaning up from a chemical accident? - I'm asking because I don't know)
 
- what safety items should be present? (type of fire extinguisher, gloves, materials for cleaning up from a chemical accident? - I'm asking because I don't know)
 +
* Fire extinguisher: ABC type for sure.
 +
* Bucket of sand. Check it once a week to make sure that the sand hasn't accreted into a solid block.
 +
* Nitrile gloves should always be in stock; they can be had cheap from American Science and Surplus.
 +
* Keep baking soda around for neutralizing acid spills, vinegar for neutralizing base spills.
 +
* Paper towels, loads of them.
 +
* A couple of lab coats. (~$17 at AS&S I think)
 +
* Safety goggles!!!!!
 +
* Eyewash bottle (always keep full with clean distilled water)
 +
* Decontamination shower (we might want to set this up outside in the alley, can make one from PVC)
 +
[[User:Mlp|Mlp]] 16:33, 1 October 2008 (PDT)

Revision as of 16:33, 1 October 2008

Last night as we were leaving there was a quick discussion about what hooding/exhaust might be needed for the chemistry that is planned. I'm not an expert here so tossing this out - what might be needed?

- the current stove exhaust may (piping material is unknown) have issues depending on what types of fumes are sent up it, however it is located already relatively close to the fish bowl space and does run up to the roof and outside

  • We're definitely going to need to build a fume hood. ANY reaction that evolves gas must be done with appropriate ventilation, even if it's a relatively harmless gas, and the vent over your average stove won't cut it. (I almost killed myself with carbon dioxide in my kitchen once, so I take this very seriously.) It would really be best if we built a fume hood with an air foil. I have a doc with instructions on how to build one, but it's scanned from a textbook so I really shouldn't upload it here. How much linear space is available near the existing exhaust vent? Mlp 16:33, 1 October 2008 (PDT)

- what safety items should be present? (type of fire extinguisher, gloves, materials for cleaning up from a chemical accident? - I'm asking because I don't know)

  • Fire extinguisher: ABC type for sure.
  • Bucket of sand. Check it once a week to make sure that the sand hasn't accreted into a solid block.
  • Nitrile gloves should always be in stock; they can be had cheap from American Science and Surplus.
  • Keep baking soda around for neutralizing acid spills, vinegar for neutralizing base spills.
  • Paper towels, loads of them.
  • A couple of lab coats. (~$17 at AS&S I think)
  • Safety goggles!!!!!
  • Eyewash bottle (always keep full with clean distilled water)
  • Decontamination shower (we might want to set this up outside in the alley, can make one from PVC)

Mlp 16:33, 1 October 2008 (PDT)

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