Difference between revisions of "Talk:Electricity Upgrade"

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initial document written tuesday, 20081007, 10 AM or so.  
 
initial document written tuesday, 20081007, 10 AM or so.  
  
please add comments, do not delete any text you have  
+
please add comments, do not delete any text you have not yourself written.  
not yourself written.  
+
 
  
 
currently the plan for electrical upgrade at 83c is as follows.  
 
currently the plan for electrical upgrade at 83c is as follows.  
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materials: EMT pipe and metal junction boxes.  
 
materials: EMT pipe and metal junction boxes.  
 +
  
 
* remove subpanel cover and discover the reality inside, mainly how studs and firebreaks are located.  
 
* remove subpanel cover and discover the reality inside, mainly how studs and firebreaks are located.  
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MILESTONE: pipe work is now complete, ready for wires  
 
MILESTONE: pipe work is now complete, ready for wires  
 +
  
 
* in subpanel, add new breakers as necessary and run wires for the following circuits:  
 
* in subpanel, add new breakers as necessary and run wires for the following circuits:  
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MILESTONE: workroom electrical upgrade is now done  
 
MILESTONE: workroom electrical upgrade is now done  
 +
  
 
NOT ADDRESSED ABOVE:  
 
NOT ADDRESSED ABOVE:  
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often on the neutral return).  
 
often on the neutral return).  
 
SO WHAT IS THE EXPECTED USE IN THE LOFT?  
 
SO WHAT IS THE EXPECTED USE IN THE LOFT?  
 +
  
 
OTHER: there are other possible useful projects:  
 
OTHER: there are other possible useful projects:  
 
* isolated AC 110: get an isolation (1:1) transformer and put a receptacle on its secondary or get two identical step(down | up) transformers, hook one primary to AC, connect secondaries, hook a receptacle to the other primary winding.  
 
* isolated AC 110: get an isolation (1:1) transformer and put a receptacle on its secondary or get two identical step(down | up) transformers, hook one primary to AC, connect secondaries, hook a receptacle to the other primary winding.  
 
BENEFIT: isolated ground, reduced problems with noise and electrical shock hazard.  
 
BENEFIT: isolated ground, reduced problems with noise and electrical shock hazard.  
 +
 
* UPS: probably good to have transformer isolation, but at any rate, make a circuit that charges a battery that can kick in to power an AC 110 emergency circuit, features can include some electronic notification of switchover and a  
 
* UPS: probably good to have transformer isolation, but at any rate, make a circuit that charges a battery that can kick in to power an AC 110 emergency circuit, features can include some electronic notification of switchover and a  
 
warning of battery-too-low condition, even logging.  
 
warning of battery-too-low condition, even logging.  
 +
 
* complementary 12 VDC or other DC power system. could use uncomplicated battery backup to provide emergency power (lights, laptops). (there are 24VDC, 48VDC... (i like +12VDC with -12VDC dual tracking, but that's probably an audio-only approach).
 
* complementary 12 VDC or other DC power system. could use uncomplicated battery backup to provide emergency power (lights, laptops). (there are 24VDC, 48VDC... (i like +12VDC with -12VDC dual tracking, but that's probably an audio-only approach).

Revision as of 18:05, 7 October 2008

based on on-site discussion and email suggestions.

initial document written tuesday, 20081007, 10 AM or so.

please add comments, do not delete any text you have not yourself written.


currently the plan for electrical upgrade at 83c is as follows.

schedule: plan to work thursday and friday, hopefully AM, hope to finish friday late afternoon, but finishing never happens as planned.

materials: EMT pipe and metal junction boxes.


  • remove subpanel cover and discover the reality inside, mainly how studs and firebreaks are located.
  • somehow, hopefully above the subpanel, punch a hole and install a four-square junction box and put an extension on it, only for wires, with a blank cover.
  • run pipe from the extension up the wall and across the edge of the ceiling toward the fishbowl shop, punch through the wall and end the pipe run with another junction box where the wall meets the ceiling ("initial j-box").
  • from the j-box in the workshop, run a length of pipe around the room at the ceiling-wall corner with j-boxes on each of three walls. also run pipe from the initial j-box to the light in the center of the ceiling.
  • from each of the ceiling-wall j-boxes, drop a piece of pipe down to another j-box 44 inches on center above the floor.
  • remove the current ceiling light fixture, inspect the box in the ceiling, add appropriate extender to accept pipe from the initial j-box, connect the pipe from the initial j-box to the new ceiling light extension. run a length of pipe either

- from ceiling extender across ceiling down some wall for a j-box for a switch 48 inches above the floor or - from the initial j-box down the wall to a j-box for a switch 48 inches....

MILESTONE: pipe work is now complete, ready for wires


  • in subpanel, add new breakers as necessary and run wires for the following circuits:

- four circuits for receptacles in workshop - one circuit (hopefully a branch of that which powers the kitchen ceiling light) for the workroom ceiling light. NOTE: it is always a good idea to ensure circuits that power receptacles do not also power lights because using receptacles is the most likely means of tripping circuit breakers: if the breaker trips, it's nice that the lights are still on, a matter of safety.

  • pull wires from sub-panel to workroom terminal j-boxes (the ones 44 inches up) and the extension for the ceiling light and switch leg.
  • wire devices as follows:

- connect and install ceiling light and its switch - install double duplexes in each terminal j-box, separate each receptacle, wire each to a different circuit, color each receptacle to reveal its circuit. - put coverplates on all j-boxes (probably an industrial tough EMT-like metal cover, in which case to which the devices are attached).

MILESTONE: workroom electrical upgrade is now done


NOT ADDRESSED ABOVE:

THE LOFT: how to improve the electricity for the upstairs ("loft"?).

  • how to get pipe up there: across ceiling and wall surfaces is best, minimize punching holes and trying to fish within walls.
  • there may be an accessible branch point (at the j-box in the toilet room or in the subpanel itself) where it's possible to break the connection to the upstairs #14 receptacles, presenting the job of getting wires from the subpanel to that point.
  • the loft has two circuits, #14 and #15. what power is required? issues are heavy loads and noisy loads. motors are both heavy (draw a lot of amps) and noisy (spikes and lows as motor turns off and on); heaters (hair dryers, hot plates...) are only heavy; some electronic devices can be noisy (return high-frequency waveforms into the line,

often on the neutral return). SO WHAT IS THE EXPECTED USE IN THE LOFT?


OTHER: there are other possible useful projects:

  • isolated AC 110: get an isolation (1:1) transformer and put a receptacle on its secondary or get two identical step(down | up) transformers, hook one primary to AC, connect secondaries, hook a receptacle to the other primary winding.

BENEFIT: isolated ground, reduced problems with noise and electrical shock hazard.

  • UPS: probably good to have transformer isolation, but at any rate, make a circuit that charges a battery that can kick in to power an AC 110 emergency circuit, features can include some electronic notification of switchover and a

warning of battery-too-low condition, even logging.

  • complementary 12 VDC or other DC power system. could use uncomplicated battery backup to provide emergency power (lights, laptops). (there are 24VDC, 48VDC... (i like +12VDC with -12VDC dual tracking, but that's probably an audio-only approach).