[German] 05/15/09 notes - Super! Danke-notes added & how to type umlauts.

Charlotte powerfrau99 at yahoo.com
Mon May 18 10:31:16 PDT 2009


Excellent addenda! 

Das Leid (prounced with a long i) sorrow, pain, part of the phrase 'Es tut mir Leid' - I am sorry, literally, it does me sorrow or pain.
Das Lied (Pronounced with a long E) Song.
When i and e go walking, the second one does the talking.
wieder (long e) again - Wiedersehen, 

der Traum
Alb is succubus!! Interesting, I had previously only seen this word, 	der Sukkubus -- thank you for checking  : )

Korrektur:
das Zählen - the act of counting
zählen -to count, "Ich zähle von eins bis zehn."
die Zahl, plural, die Zahlen,

ENDINGS
der Mann --- ein alter Mann (-r indicates masculine gender)
die Frau --- eine alte Frau (-e indicates feminine)
das Auto --- ein altes Auto (-s indicates neuter)

DER			DIE			DAS
mein alter Mann 	meine alte Frau	        mein altes Auto
dein alter Mann		meine alte Frau	        mein altes Auto
kein alter Mann		keine alte Frau	        kein altes Auto


When the gender is already shown on der, die or das words, then just add an "e" to the adjective (or an en — more on that a little later)

der alte Mann	      die alte Frau			das alte Auto


Implied verbs happen in German: 
Augen auf.....
Augen auf implies the verb, "machen" make or do
Ich mache die Augen auf...

The other verbs implied often: 
gehen - to go 
fahren - to drive or ride


To create Umlauts 
(I do not know whether this works on Macs)
Engage numbers lock key then press alt and type 225 on the numeric keypad= ß
alt 132 = ä
alt 129 = ü
alt 148 = ö
alt 225 = ß

an Umlaut can entirely change the meaning of a word.



"There are two ways to live -- one as if nothing is a miracle, the other is as if everything is a miracle." Albert Einstein


--- On Fri, 5/15/09, Jeffrey Malone <ieatlint at tehinterweb.com> wrote:

> From: Jeffrey Malone <ieatlint at tehinterweb.com>
> Subject: Re: [German] 05/15/09 notes from the first meeting.
> To: "NoiseBridge" <German at lists.noisebridge.net>
> Date: Friday, May 15, 2009, 12:24 PM
> Wow, thanks for the great
> notes.  I'm sure all of us really appreciate it!
> 
> I have a couple minor corrections however:
> 
> > • ❑ grosse / groß
> "gross" is a common spelling of groß when an eszett (ß)
> isn't
> available (or when spellt in upercase, as there is no
> uppercase eszett
> [eg, "EIN GROSSER MANN"]).  The added 'e' however
> would be a
> conjugated version of the adjective, such as in "Sie ist
> eine große
> Frau".
> 
> > • ❑ die Zahlen
> die Zahl is a number, however the plural becomes die
> Zählen through
> the weird vowel change rules.
> 
> > ▼ ❑ der
> ..
> > • ❑ Leid
> It's actually das Leid.
> 
> Slight mix-up on these:
> > • ❑ Der altes Man
> > • ❑ Die alter Frau
> > • ❑ Die alte Bier
> 
> Der alter Mann
> Die alte Frau
> Das altes Bier
> 
> 
> > ▶ ❑ german language reform
> > happened in roughly 2000... inconsistent usage of how
> to spell things
> > especially with ß
> In a fit of boredom I actually looked up this reform that
> I've heard
> referenced so many times...
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_spelling_reform_of_1996
> If anyone else is so bored and curious. 

Yup, intro'd and then considered to be Pflicht (required) by 2004-2006. But as you can see it met a lot of resistance. You'll see materials with variations, especially booked printed before the reform was voted, and before it became more or less required, 
> 
> > • ❑ watched the Wir Sind Helden
> If curious, "Helden" means heroes, so the title is "We are
> heroes"..
> 
> > • ❑ singular
> > der Traume - the dream
> > der Alptraume  - the nightmare
> 
> The trailing 'e' is actually not there in the singular, and
> it's both
> Traum and Alptraum.
> As an added tidbit, der Alp is actually a word according to
> my
> dictionary -- it means incubus.
> 
> 
> > • ❑ die Puls - pulse
> der Puls
> 
> > • ❑ bewärten - acceptable values.... FIGHT THE
> MAN
> This is a bit beyond what we're currently covering with
> grammar.  It's
> "bewährten", but it's also a conjugated verb to the simple
> past tense.
>  If you want to look up the word, use "bewähren".
> 
> > • ❑ lauf = to walk
> More often means "to run", and is "laufen" in its
> infinitive verb form
> (der Lauf for "the run").
> 
> > • ❑ Augen auf = open your eyes
> This is used colloquially, as it lacks a verb... "Eyes
> open" would be
> the literal meaning as I understand it.  It seems like
> it's used the
> same in English, where one can say "[keep your] eyes open"
> to indicate
> "watch for something" .. but I really don't know.
> 
> 
> Anyway, once again I really appreciate the notes.
> Also, I disclaim responsibility for the mistakes I myself
> have likely
> made above :)
> 
> Jeffrey
> _______________________________________________
> German mailing list
> German at lists.noisebridge.net
> https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/german
> 


      


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