<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">hi folks,<div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>i'm at my nonprofit office this week and got down off the shelf our copy of "<b>how to form a nonprofit corporation in california</b>" by nolo press. it's interesting stuff, and it corrects a piece of misinformation i posted to this list a few days ago. more on that later.&nbsp;</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>the book suggests that forming a nonprofit is not that hard nor expensive; it's some forms and paperwork and about $200 in fees. federal tax-exempt status is possible but not automatic and is a separate process. all the talk below about the different 501(c) classes are secondary to getting california nonprofit status, although the book strongly promotes the desirability of attaining tax-exempt public charity status.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>there are three classes of nonprofit corporation in california: <b>public benefit corporation</b>, <b>religious corporation</b>, and <b>mutual benefit corporation</b>.&nbsp;</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>to qualify as a <b>public benefit corporation</b>, the standard is that a "reasonable person" must find that the group's purpose is either "charitable" or "public." scientific, literary, and educational groups fit this definition and also qualify for federal 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status. however the benefits of the group need to be targeted towards the public (i.e. not just group members) but <i>can</i> be narrowly defined: for instance, we exist to serve the "scientifically needy" and anyone can use the services of our organization if they meet that criteria. "advancement of education or science" and "promotion and development of the arts" are two IRS clauses of acceptable 501(c)(3) group activities that noisebridge could meet that also fall in the california public benefit class.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>"civil leagues" and "social welfare groups" also fall in the public benefit class but are federal 501(c)(4) groups and are not allowed tax-deductible donations. this normally applies to volunteer fire departments and some housing associations but might also apply to a club or hobby group.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>the irs also has a 501(c)(10) class of "domestic fraternal societies" operating under the lodge system and which devote their earnings to religious, scientific, educational, literary, charitable, and/or fraternal purposes, but which do not pay insurance or other benefits to members. these groups are allowed tax-deductible donations but i think you have to show a secret handshake to qualify.&nbsp;</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div><div>unless we form as a branch of the church of the flying spaghetti monster or jedi knights or something we probably would not fit in the&nbsp;<b>religious</b>&nbsp;<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: bold; ">corporation&nbsp;<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal; ">category (but it would be fun). you don't need to be a church to get this designation, but could be a group organized to "promote and study the practices of a particular religion." pastafarians, for example, are really keen on studying science, statistics, global warming, and pirates (would the later category include hackers?). california won't question your religious practices, but the federal government will if you apply for religious tax exemption. the federal test is pretty vague; the group must have "truly and sincerely held beliefs" and not engage in a lot of commercial activity (like selling bibles, but i guess bake sales are ok). "celebrating the divine presence in all natural phenomena" would be enough religion to qualify. &nbsp;</span></span></div><div><br></div></div><div>to qualify as a&nbsp;<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: bold; ">mutual benefit corporation</span>&nbsp;you form a group the exists to exclusively benefit its members. this is a catch-all and includes all california groups that are not public benefit or religious. groups in this category generally cannot qualify for 501(c)(3) tax exempt status and can't get benefits like nonprofit mailing rates, personal property tax exemption, etc. organizational gains and profits cannot be distributed to members, but members can benefit from things like services and facilities. noisbridge might fall in this category but the books makes it sounds like you probably wouldn't want to.&nbsp;</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>there's also a special kind of california corporation called a <b>cooperative corporation </b>that is comprised of "producers or consumers" organized for their mutual benefit. basically a "co-op," like a grocery store. noisebridge could conceivably be a co-op since it exists to help member produce things and some of those could be marketable. i'm not sure this is a good fit however as it seems that the group's major function is more about education or resource sharing than production.</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>the books lists five benefits of nonprofit corporations status, and those are<b> </b>possible<b> tax exemptions</b>, <b>limited liability</b>, <b>perpetual legal existence</b>, <b>employee benefits </b>(access to special health care rates, etc), and <b>formality </b>(such as bylaws, minutes, articles, etc.). this is where i was wrong: the board of directors is NOT financially liable for the organization's actions, and limited liability means the staff and board are protected from having their personal assets seized. any organizational debt stays organizational debt. the only exemption is if an officer fails in his/her "duty to care" and harms the group, then they can be compelled to personally pay the organization for damages. this also got me thinking that if the nonprofit has employees, would san francisco require the group to pay health insurance? this could be a major reason to become a corporation but NOT hire any staff for work (paying contractors to do certain jobs is ok, and board members can be paid for their time within some limits).</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>disclaimer: IANAL but i can retype legalese. i'm posting this for the group illumination and discussion and whoever decides to bottom-line this process should get their own copy of the book. :-)&nbsp;</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div><div>i also see that the noisebridge nonprofit could be narrowly defined and created for the sole purpose of rent and insurance, and leave the group itself alone to organize more informally; i.e. rules on space access, membership, projects, etc. are not covered by the nonprofit's bylaws.&nbsp;noisebridge would be a club with no legal existence and some members would serve on the board of the nonprofit that exists to assist the club. or the nonprofit can be more largely defined to include formal bylaws for how the organization and space is structured and run, and members have certain duties (like fees) and rights (like voting for board members and bylaws). i'm sure there are pro and cons to each approach.&nbsp;</div><div><br class="webkit-block-placeholder"></div></body></html>