Gallium is not known to be toxic, though there isn&#39;t a huge amount of data on its toxicity.  It also has a much lower vapor pressure than mercury, even at high temperatures (it doesn&#39;t evaporate readily), so you won&#39;t inhale much.   I wouldn&#39;t eat it though.  Its physical properties are a lot like aluminum.<br>
<br>There&#39;s an msds <a href="http://www.espi-metals.com/msds%27s/gallium.pdf">here</a>, from which:<br><br>Health Hazard Information<br>Exposure Limits in Air: (TWA or suggested control figure):  There is no specific TWA established for this product. <br>
Acute Effects: <br>Inhalation:  No inhalation hazards of gallium have been identified.  Good industrial hygiene practice suggests limiting exposure to all <br>repairable particulates. <br>Ingestion:  Evidence suggests low toxicity potential due to poor absorption by the oral route. <br>
Skin:  May cause irritation.  Some sources suggest gallium may cause dermatitis, although patch testing humans with  metallic <br>gallium did not cause a positive reaction. <br>Eye:  May cause eye irritation. <br>Chronic Effects:  Intravenous administration to humans caused metallic taste, skin rashes and bone marrow  depression as well as<br>
anorexia, nausea and vomiting.  May cause damage to kidneys. <br>Carcinogenicity:  This product does not contain any ingredient designated by IARP, NTP, ACGIH or OSHA as a probable human <br>carcinogen. <br>Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Overexposure:  No data found. <br>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Jun 5, 2009 at 4:54 PM, Andrew Cantino <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:cantino@gmail.com">cantino@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Isn&#39;t gallium toxic like Hg?<br>
<div><div></div><div class="h5"><br>
On Friday, June 5, 2009, Noah Balmer &lt;<a href="mailto:noahbalmer@gmail.com">noahbalmer@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt; It is fairly uncommon for liquids to expand when they fuse.  I think bismuth does the same thing, and water does, as you mentioned, but don&#39;t know of anything else offhand.  In the case of water it has to do with a crystal structure that requires more space than the amorphous liquid does*.  I don&#39;t know what the mechanism is with gallium.  It has conchoidal fracture, which is commonly seen in amorphous glassy solids, so I think it may be some other mechanism, but it may just be a very fine grained crystalline structure.<br>

&gt;<br>
&gt; -N<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; *Water molecules are approximately L-shaped.  When they can flow feely around each other they can spoon and hook around each other in all sorts of ways that increase the density.  When they are frozen into a regular grid, the inside of the L is empty, so they are packed less densely.  Pressure on ice near the melting point can disrupt the crystal structure and re-liquify it, which is one of the reasons ice skates work so well.  A gallium skating pond might work too, though gallium loves alloying so much it might just dissolve the blades (it dissolves aluminum readily, don&#39;t bring it on a plane!) , and in its liquid form it&#39;s kind of sticky.<br>

&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; On Fri, Jun 5, 2009 at 3:48 PM, d p chang &lt;<a href="mailto:pchang@macrovision.com">pchang@macrovision.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Noah Balmer &lt;<a href="mailto:noahbalmer@gmail.com">noahbalmer@gmail.com</a>&gt; writes:<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; I&amp;#39;m surprised to see it stored in a glass vial in that image<br>
&gt;&gt; though, because it expands by a few percent when it solidifies, and<br>
&gt;&gt; will often break rigid containers.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; wow. i thought water was &#39;weird&#39; that it expanded when it became a<br>
&gt; solid. am i just mis-remembering something or is this actually common?<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; \p<br>
&gt; ---<br>
&gt; I know that you believe that you understood what you think I said, but I<br>
&gt; am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.<br>
&gt;                 - Robert McCloskey<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>