<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>I don't think that outsiders are necessarily, or even typically, angry. And I don't think hubris is long tolerated in a community of true contributors.</div><div><br></div><div>I think the difference between outsiders and contributors is scale of identification. Outsiders identify with the group of people around them socially, contributors with something larger but abstract.&nbsp;Outsiders see themselves as contributors, at least to their group; the people outside their group are seen as aliens and outside the scope of analysis.</div><div><br></div><div>In turn, people's scale of identification is determined powerfully by the level of security they have felt in their life.</div><div><br></div><div><blockquote type="cite">How do&nbsp;we work with each person to help them evolve?<br></blockquote><div><br></div></div></div>First, by framing the case as one of evolution! KATZ!<div><br></div><div>Without gravity, which direction will a tree grow? And other than gravity, what does it need but sunlight and water? (For purposes of poetry, let us neglect nitrogen-fixing bacteria.)</div><div><div><br></div><div>On dates various, Jason Dusek wrote:</div><div><blockquote type="cite"><div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; "><font face="Helvetica" size="3" color="#000000" style="font: 12.0px Helvetica; color: #000000"><b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(20, 79, 174); -webkit-text-stroke-width: -1; ">&nbsp;Hackers must also have a characteristic fault; what will it</span></span></b></font></div></div><div> &nbsp;be? It seems the outsider is characterized by anger; the<br> &nbsp;contributor, hubris.</div></blockquote><div><br></div>[...]</div><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="-webkit-text-stroke-width: -1; ">&nbsp;Maybe the "outsider" is a stage on the way to "contributor"? I</span></div></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><div> &nbsp;think it takes a different moral sensibility to be committed<br> &nbsp;to others' welfare, as opposed to one's personal excellence.<br><br> &nbsp;Perhaps the outsider/contributor space is a projection from<br> &nbsp;the space of moral evolution. In that case, I think we must<br> &nbsp;set aside the notion of a general approach to helping people<br> &nbsp;move from one stage to the other. Each person's evolution is<br> &nbsp;individual, triggered by events of hidden significance. How do<br> &nbsp;we work with each person to help them evolve?<br></div></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>