This is indeed true, but what was found was significantly more than a tiny bead, which suggests that something like an old thermostat or tilt switch as Jonathan mentions.  The neon sign in question was an old Budweiser (probably conventional neon with no mercury) sign found in the alley with every tube broken before it even entered the space.  <br>
<br>This is a very poor answer for why we had puddles of mercury on our table.  As a highly toxic substance, it&#39;s not the sort of thing that&#39;s floating around in random electrical or electronic components.  It&#39;s important that anyone handling anything with any amount of mercury be cognizant of the hazards they pose to us all and follow acceptable handling protocols, which we don&#39;t have the equipment to do at Noisebridge (yet!).<br>
<br clear="all">Christie<br><br>---<br> Knowledge will bind you but ultimately set you free.<br>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jun 24, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Sai Emrys <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:noisebridge@saizai.com">noisebridge@saizai.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="im">On Wed, Jun 24, 2009 at 10:57 AM, Jonathan Foote&lt;<a href="mailto:jtfoote@ieee.org">jtfoote@ieee.org</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt; A mercury vapor  streetlamp will have a visible amount of Hg, but little more that a<br>
&gt; tiny bead.<br>
<br>
</div>A tiny bead of mercury still calls for full evac and hazardous<br>
materials handling. Mercury vapor is serious shit.<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
- Sai<br>
</font></blockquote></div><br>