<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">&gt; As such, I don&#39;t regard it as any type of<br><div class="im">

&gt; deception -- there&#39;s more mercury at the fish stands at fisherman&#39;s<br>
&gt; warf than on the table at noisebridge.<br>
<br>
</div>I don&#39;t think anyone claimed deception.<br>
</blockquote><div><br>I did say that  the &quot;we don&#39;t know where it came from but we know we got it all&quot; idea sounds like <i>self</i>-deception.  <br><br>If you don&#39;t know what the source is, you don&#39;t know whether the source is still in the space and still contaminated. <br>
<br>I believe that everyone involved in cleanup did the best that they could under the circumstances, I don&#39;t mean that anyone is being deceitful.  Unfortunately, toxins don&#39;t care if you believe they are present or not.  Since the source is unknown, and may be a leaky box, with puddle of mercury on the bottom, that was placed on the table, then moved, or any number of other equally bad-news scenarios, confident assertions of complete cleanup sound overly optimistic.  <br>
<br>I don&#39;t come around the space much anymore, so my only interest in this is that I don&#39;t want my friends to get sick.  I think the rational thing would be for ye voting members to vote to pay for the necessary professional assessment, of the pros with a vapor detector variety.  Barring agreement on that, I, for one, would chip in toward this. It may not affect me directly, but I care about your brains and don&#39;t want them to be damaged<br>
<br>If any of the cleanup materials <i>did</i> land in the trash as some have suggested, please belay those trash bags.  Mercury leaching from landfills is a notable groundwater concern, and the kind people who take away the refuse deserve better than to be exposed without their knowledge.<br>
<br></div></div><br>