Professional society dues (such as IEEE or ACM) are generally tax deductible as a career expense, even if you aren&#39;t working for yourself.  These are up there with uniforms (pity suits aren&#39;t included) and conferences.<br>
<br>Did you stick a mileage counter on your bike?  I&#39;m trying to figure out how you&#39;d measure that.<br><br>Christie<br><br>Then again, IANAL nor am I a tax accountant.  Consult with a professional you&#39;re willing to pay if you want advice you can count on.<br clear="all">
--- <br>Pigs can fly given sufficient thrust. <br>     - RFC 1925<br>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Aug 20, 2009 at 4:57 PM, Sai Emrys <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:noisebridge@saizai.com">noisebridge@saizai.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="im">On Thu, Aug 20, 2009 at 4:41 PM, dpc&lt;<a href="mailto:weasel@meer.net">weasel@meer.net</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt; Another interesting thing... often employers will match, or completely pay<br>
&gt;&gt; for dues in professional organizations.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; w/o the emplyer match (if you&#39;re itemizing) these dues are tax deductable.<br>
<br>
</div>They are not tax deductible as a donation, employer match or no,<br>
because they aren&#39;t one.<br>
<br>
Maybe they qualify as a business expense or somesuch, but I don&#39;t know<br>
that side of things. Any tax lawyers / accountants in the audience<br>
able to give a definitive answer?<br>
<div class="im"><br>
&gt; i tried to count my bike as a &#39;commuting vehicle&#39; expense when i was working for myself. the cost per mile computation was a little weird though.<br>
<br>
</div>That is awesome.<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
- Sai<br>
</font></blockquote></div><br>