<div>On Sun, Oct 18, 2009 at 12:01 PM, John Magolske <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:listmail@b79.net">listmail@b79.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:</div><div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
While it would be good that a cleaning person not be adverse to<br>
picking up bottles &amp; half-eaten burritos, I feel strongly that members<br>
should not leave these items around, and that we as a group should try<br>
to find constructive ways to help each other not be so sloppy (and<br>
gross, especially the burrito stumps!) Also, if the cleaning person<br>
comes once or twice a week, food laying around in that interim will<br>
feed the rats &amp; roaches. We don&#39;t need to wait for the problem of<br>
random abandoned food-trash + rats &amp; roaches to happen before we solve<br>
it -- this is already happening. Let&#39;s engage our creativity to adjust<br>
our system (in a friendly way) such that these problems are mitigated.</blockquote><div><br></div><div>We&#39;ve gone out of our way to build a non-coercive system of self governance.  The &quot;leaving your goddamned bottles around is a MORTAL SIN&quot; discussion is just another example of a social problem which is harder than it looks, and which can cause immense problems when it&#39;s tackled naively.  In another thread the discussion of how we can systematically solve the abandoned-burrito-problem has resulted in a proposed NoiseBridge Police Force -- something that nobody would countenance over a safety issue, we&#39;re OK with discussing over ucky beer cans.</div>
<div><br></div><div>People are messier than they think they are.  This means that everybody under-estimates the amount of mess that they make, and over-estimates the amount of mess that everybody else makes.  Consequently, when there&#39;s a discussion of how to fairly clean up our mess, everybody thinks someone else should do it (&quot;I clean up my mess, why can&#39;t everybody else?&quot;).</div>
<div><br></div><div>The solution to this problem is to approach it as a Task To Be Handled (eg, cleaning up) rather than as a Behavior To Be Enforced.  We can either form a Janitorial Crew, who handle this on a volunteer basis, or we can hire someone to do it.  In the past, we&#39;ve hired someone; I think we should do so again.</div>
<div><br></div><div>--S</div></div>
</div>