I like the conversational quality of it; in this way it&#39;s a vast improvement over email.<div><br></div><div>However, it has a ways to go in terms of making it possible to GENERATE work rather than just talk about it.</div>
<div><br></div><div>E.g. try copying streams of conversation out of it and into something useful, like, ohh, Google Docs.  Nope!</div><div><br></div><div>I wouldn&#39;t invest time in collaborating through Google Wave until they make it less of a silo.</div>
<div><br></div><div>--Naomi</div><div><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Dec 10, 2009 at 1:56 PM, Glen Jarvis <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:glen@glenjarvis.com">glen@glenjarvis.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div style="word-wrap:break-word">Here is a cut and paste from a previous email I sent on the subject. Forgive the cut-and-paste, but it seems mostly relevant and addresses what you&#39;re asking:<div><br></div><div>I think this is where wave is revolutionary. Does anyone else remember the Gopher, Archie, Veronica, etc. days?  When we had a text based system (gopher was a hierarchy  of text documents that one could navigate)? If one wanted a free ware program, we&#39;d go to Archie to get it. If you wanted to search for different freeware programs, one would go to Veronica (it&#39;s been a long time, did I get that backwards)?  Or, if one wanted to get a graphic from a usenet group, we would capture the text from the usenet group (the uuencoded tagged portion) and then we&#39;d paste the pieces together and manually uudecode it to get a graphic. That&#39;s a big *big* pain to be able to work -- but, that&#39;s how everyone worked... we were used to it... until something came along... a Mosaic browser... that allowed us to integrate our Gopher libraries (<a href="gopher://..." target="_blank">gopher://...</a>), with images and files and even this new very simple hypertext language (<a href="http://.../" target="_blank">http://...</a>)....  <br>
<br>Wave is similar in the fact that it&#39;s very rich... it&#39;s editable by different people at the same time.. it&#39;s like one-stop-shopping in a communication format similar to how the web was suddenly one-stop-shopping for all of these images.  For example, the other day, a coworker, in IRC, pasted a link that had his code numbered (too much to paste into IRC). We were using two different mediums (external links to web pages, and IRC) to communicate. We&#39;re accustomed to it, but it&#39;s a lot of extra work than being able to chat directly in a wave, with text, that both can see edits on, and even syntax coloring..... we started using wave.. boom.. one-stop-shopping again...<br>
<div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Cheers</div><div><br></div><font color="#888888"><div>Glen</div></font><div class="im"><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>On Dec 10, 2009, at 1:49 PM, Michael Shiloh wrote:</div><br>
<blockquote type="cite"><div>Forgive my ignorance.<br><br>I know very little about Google Wave, and I&#39;m really curious: is <br>everyone jumping onto it, or do some people have reservations? If so, <br>what are they?<br>
<br>Convince me why I&#39;m a fool for not asking Martin for an invite.<br><br>M</div></blockquote></div></div></div></div><br>_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Naomi Theora Most<br><a href="mailto:naomi@nthmost.com">naomi@nthmost.com</a><br>+1-415-728-7490<br><br>skype: nthmost<br><br><a href="http://twitter.com/nthmost">http://twitter.com/nthmost</a><br>

</div>