<div class="gmail_quote">I just read about this interesting take on Arduino.  The Maple Leaf board is not just an ARM Cortex-M3 system that is pin compatible with Arduino Shields, but it is also an attempt to get Arduino code compiled and running on an ARM chip via the same comfortable Arduino IDE that has become popular.</div>

<div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><a href="http://leaflabs.com/Maple" target="_blank">http://leaflabs.com/Maple</a></div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><a href="http://leaflabs.com/Maple" target="_blank"></a>The take away from this is, AVR guru&#39;s be damned, the Arduino platform has transcended a single architecture and is ready to leap to more powerful physical computing systems.  The leap, hopefully, will be as trivial as a recompile and bidirectional.  This also means that Arduino might start to become a viable platform for realtime system programming made easy.  It may be a large leap of speculation, but this may take us away from the complexity of ARM based Linux systems and pricey real time Linux adaptations when working with simple embedded systems.<br>


<font color="#888888"><font color="#000000"><br></font></font></div><div class="gmail_quote"><font color="#888888"><font color="#000000">The ARM Cortex-M3 is a recent addition to the ARM family, compatible with the Cortex series, but lower power, less sophisticated, and cheaper.  Being 70MHz, 32bit, and having a hardware divide, this is a huge boost of performance over the ATMega systems.</font></font></div>

<div class="gmail_quote"><font color="#888888"><font color="#000000"><br></font></font></div><div class="gmail_quote"><font color="#888888"><font color="#000000">Of course, it is probably far more powerful than the work most people would load on to an Arduino, and, as such, there may be a precious few sold to us hobbyists.  Still, there is always someone out there trying to find a way to do things faster, so here you go.</font></font></div>