<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jan 6, 2010 at 8:57 PM, Christie Dudley <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:longobord@gmail.com">longobord@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
A couple of things:<div>1) I don&#39;t see any recognition of &quot;good&quot; credit.  This is reported on your credit rating too, after all.  It&#39;s very important to everyone involved.</div></blockquote><div><br>Unless I&#39;m mistaken, &quot;good credit&quot; means the number of accounts that are held in good standing. This information would certainly be available. Particularly, one could see how many accounts an individual has and how long he/she has held the accounts in good standing, without negative claims made against them.<br>
<br>Currently, I don&#39;t think lending institutions go out of their way to make positive notations to the credit file of someone who consistently pays on-time, or whether such a thing is even possible. But I could certainly imagine our service offering that.<br>
<br><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><div>2) One thing that&#39;s not included in the portion of your credit report that&#39;s given to you, but is given to potential creditors is your arrest record.  Landlords especially like to see this.  It&#39;s a horrible thing to have, considering it&#39;s not something that&#39;s reviewed for accuracy by anybody and you have no rights regarding it&#39;s contents (&quot;Because it doesn&#39;t matter, right?&quot;)  </div>
</blockquote><div><br>I consider the two concepts mutually orthogonal but I might be thinking too ideally about that. I wonder how important this info is to creditors. How common is is for larger institutions to check this sorta thing? I could definitely see the case with landlords, but I&#39;m wondering if, for instance, credit card or cell phone companies care. My gut feeling is that this may not be all too important, but I may be wrong.<br>
<br><br><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div>3) All of the current credit bureaus share information, so the creditor has the most complete, accurate information to make a decision on.  How could this system work with existing systems?  It seems to me that it would require all creditors in the world to subscribe at once, which simply isn&#39;t likely, or even possible.</div>

<div><br></div></blockquote><div><br>Yes, we have a bit of a boot-strapping problem. That is, people already have credit histories, but we wouldn&#39;t have that data. As a personal preference I would like to keep it that way. I sorta consider the data kept by the credit bureaus to be tainted in a sense. This data was collected under a different set of policies and with a different dispute/fairness mechanism.<br>
<br>Thus initially everybody would have a clean slate, but over time, once more and more accounts are registered with the system, the credit histories are slowly built-up. That means, at first, companies would need to check this system along with the existing credit bureaus, but eventually this could be the single go-to source for credit history.<br>
<br>This poses a problem for adoption. What&#39;s the incentive to use this system if you still have to use the old systems? So it&#39;s certainly a problem we&#39;d need to think about and try to solve.<br><br><br></div>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><div><br></div>
</blockquote></div><br>