<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jan 6, 2010 at 6:10 PM, Jason Dusek <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jason.dusek@gmail.com">jason.dusek@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<br>  On problem I see with your system is that you have a default<br>
  judgement in favour of the lending institution. It would be<br>
  nice to have something more compatible with the notion of<br>
  innocence in the absence of evidence.<br>
<font color="#888888"><br></font></blockquote><div><br>Oh sorry I forgot to add that. I figured it would be just the opposite. When a negative claim is issued it may be disputed. When a user disputes the claim, then the lender would be given some amount of time in which to provide records (contracts, receipts for services, etc) to support the claim. The timing would probably be somewhere around 60-90 days, just as a guess. If no action is taken by the company by then, the claim is removed.<br>
<br>Of course this is where the dispute remediation comes in. So some additional mechanism would be needed here, be it a really good AI (unlikely) or humans. Also, one could expect that nearly all negative claims would be disputed, so perhaps there could be a deterrent to firivlous disputes. Maybe something along the lines of what you were saying before - if each company and individual carried with them a record of the number of disputes they&#39;ve been involved in and the number they have won/lost, then potential creditors/borrowers could use that information in making their decisions.<br>
<br>The solution above is an idea, I&#39;m sure there may be better ways to ensure fairness, so I&#39;d certainly love to hear other ideas.<br><br>- Brian<br></div></div>