On Fri, Jan 8, 2010 at 3:21 AM, Sai Emrys <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:saizai@gmail.com" target="_blank">saizai@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">

Another practical question: how would you ensure that people report<br>
their feedback, rather than only searching for others&#39;?<br>
<br></blockquote><div><br>It&#39;s similar motivation as with the existing systems. It&#39;s used as a deterrent. If a creditor wants to get you to pay, they&#39;ll threaten to dent your credit. In fact, this could be used as a major selling point. If with initial adoption you can show that the service is effective in getting people to settle debts, then it becomes valuable to creditors because it saves them money on collections agencies.<br>

<br> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
It&#39;s crucial to getting useful data, and in the usual cases, it&#39;s done<br>
by contractual obligation. AFAICT you don&#39;t intend to have such a<br>
mandatory-reporting relationship with your users, and IMPE any site<br>
that doesn&#39;t somehow has a high reader:contributor ratio.<br>
<font color="#888888"><br></font></blockquote><div><br>Yes, In general, I would expect this service to have a higher reader-to-contributor ratio, but that&#39;s not necessarily a bad thing. So long as you can get enough contributors to make it useful then it will be able to sustain itself. I look at this similarly to Wikipedia - it has a very high reader-to-contributor ratio, but it&#39;s still getting useful data and still driving tons of traffic.<br>
<br>- Brian<br></div></div>