Oops.<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Jan 12, 2010 at 10:59, Michael Shiloh <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:michaelshiloh1010@gmail.com">michaelshiloh1010@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

Why do we perceive a sine audio wave as a &quot;pure&quot; tone? Does it have to<br>
do with the mechanical vibrations in our ear? Does any non-sine wave<br>
introduce harmonics, vibrations other than the fundamental, which our<br>
brain perceives as non-pure?<br>
<br>
Regardless of mechanics, what is the perceptive reason a sine wave<br>
sounds pure?<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br><div> <span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; border-collapse: collapse; ">Wait. OK, so if we have cones of hairs, each cone and each hair narrowing pretty rapidly and sloping in toward a point at the common center say 1 1/2 times (? I&#39;m not gonna go out for an image right now) as high as the diameter of the circle circumscribing the bunched bases of the tuftlet, and there&#39;s a little beach-ball stuck out horizontally (?) from the side of some hair(s) at the apex, what are the resonant frequencies / modes of vibration of them all / the tuft as a whole?  Maybe a tuft is better than a single cone at damping out certain things. (Or p&#39;raps its just that |_{HAIR}_| is a part that happens to be ready-at-hand on the genetic hack-shelf).</span></div>

<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; border-collapse: collapse; "><div><br></div><div>Actually, what I wanna know ...rather, isn&#39;t it really a question of the clumping / gap patterns in the train of those axon action-potential spikes that you get in the attached neurons [at different volumes?]?</div>

<div>Maybe sine waves produce very evenly evenly spaced spikes or something. Or something cooler: maybe sines do something else kinda simple, but there&#39;s something better than a sine wave, that would provide the perfect spike train, and matches our architecture in there better, and would sound even more &quot;fundamental&quot; in the gen&#39;l sense of the word. Or just sound some particular flavor of Amazing. </div>

<div><br></div><div>I mean for someone with neurons sculpted via a lifetime of primarily modern western temperament music.</div><div><br></div><div>It&#39;d be cool to look up for five hours. Maybe people have sacrificed other auditory-cilia animals to measure same?</div>

<div><br></div><div>Tho&#39; it seems a diifferent question from the one you asked. </div><div>I&#39;m just sayin&#39;</div></span>