<div><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Feb 7, 2010 at 11:00 AM, jim <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jim@well.com">jim@well.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

<br>
<br>
   how will &quot;we&quot; know that you have a particular book?<br>
(for the record, i&#39;m still against this practice for<br>
reasons previously expressed but yet unaddressed.)</blockquote><div><br></div>I&#39;ll tell you, either in person or on the mailing list, as you prefer.  And I keep a record on Toodledo of all the books I&#39;ve either lent out or been lent.  Currently, two economics books out for a friend to finish a paper.   I realize you don&#39;t know me, but the last time I was told I had something and couldn&#39;t find it, I spent over $100 and many months tracking down and replacing their Paul Pope collection.  They found the originals in the basement when they moved.</div>

<div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">It sounds as though your reasons are trust related.  I can understand that, but if you&#39;re really worried about people walking out with books and not returning them, the best solution is to have them in a locked room and only give out the key to people you know will give them back.</div>

<div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">Besides which, what motivation would I have for not telling you that I had a particular book?  It would be wrong for me to take something that wasn&#39;t freely given, and it would be just as wrong to lie about the having of it afterwards.  My personal integrity is worth more to me than a $15 paperback.</div>

<div class="gmail_quote"><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">Will. </div>