In addition, I plan to scan the next chapter (Functor), and send it over to those willing to go ahead with studying the book and doing the exercises. I got a feeling that our discussions will be way more productive if we are on the same level: meaning that it would be better to discuss monadic stuff after we are sure functors, natural transformations, and also maybe adjointness and limits are firmly established notions - but of course these are cool areas anyway, initial algebras for specific Haskell monads etc, so probably it makes sense to share time, giving space to both.<br>
<br><div class="gmail_quote">2010/2/12 Jason Dusek <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jason.dusek@gmail.com">jason.dusek@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
  The meeting was held in the Alonzo Church classroom. Tea cakes<br>
  (chocolate &amp; banana bread) and almonds were served. Next time,<br>
  I&#39;ll bring some decent tea.<br>
<br>
<br>
  Attending: Vlad, Mikael, myself, Nicholas, Ian &amp; Rebecca.<br>
<br>
<br>
  The meeting opened with some material from the text: a simple<br>
  problem on functors and a discussion of the &quot;map-lifting<br>
  property&quot;.<br>
<br>
<br>
  I brought up comonadic IO for discussion but little progress<br>
  was made.<br>
<br>
<br>
  Nicholas wished to talk about type specifications and how we<br>
  use them for correctness in functional programming. We<br>
  discussed the specific examples of trees.<br>
<br>
<br>
  Vlad sketched out a tree datatype and mentioned that it should<br>
  be a poset, too. Mikael objected to this and objected to<br>
  calling these rooted datatypes trees. Turns out in graph<br>
  theory, trees are a different thing:<br>
<br>
    <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_%28graph_theory%29" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_%28graph_theory%29</a><br>
<br>
  The tree data structure of CS fame is an &quot;arborescence&quot; to<br>
  graph theorists:<br>
<br>
    <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arborescence_%28graph_theory%29" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arborescence_%28graph_theory%29</a><br>
<br>
  There was also some discussion of pointers and identity.<br>
<br>
<br>
  Really, though, Nicholas&#39;s ideas about specification involved<br>
  a notion of functors and so we came back to those. Vlad and<br>
  Mikael presented on the list monad and fixed points were<br>
  briefly introduced.<br>
<br>
<br>
  Somewhere in all this, Ian mentioned he had to go. We all<br>
  opted to leave at that point. Vlad and I will continue on in<br>
  Chapter 3, &quot;Functors&quot;, and do a few problems.<br>
<br>
--<br>
Jason Dusek<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
--<br>
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups &quot;Bay Area Categories And Types&quot; group.<br>
To post to this group, send email to <a href="mailto:bacat@googlegroups.com">bacat@googlegroups.com</a>.<br>
To unsubscribe from this group, send email to <a href="mailto:bacat%2Bunsubscribe@googlegroups.com">bacat+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com</a>.<br>
For more options, visit this group at <a href="http://groups.google.com/group/bacat?hl=en" target="_blank">http://groups.google.com/group/bacat?hl=en</a>.<br>
<br>
</font></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Thanks,<br>-Vlad<br>