<html>
<head>
<style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 10pt;
font-family:Verdana
}
--></style>
</head>
<body class='hmmessage'>
Warning -- ramble ahead...<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
Hey Nuno!<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
I also always want to be in a hackerspace.&nbsp; Well,&nbsp;at least a hackerspace mentality.&nbsp; Which is why I do what I do -- teaching people&nbsp;how to make things,&nbsp;traveling around, helping people&nbsp;with their hackerspaces,&nbsp;giving talks to encourage others to&nbsp;do what they think is cool. . .&nbsp; And it's why I was a co-founder of Noisebridge.&nbsp; I wanted a place I could hang out with people I enjoy hanging out.&nbsp; All this has worked out amazingly well for me.<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
My company is not a hackerspace, though I do run it with much of the philosophy we all discussed when starting Noisebridge.&nbsp; Unlike a hackerspace, my company, Cornfield Electronics, has a product.&nbsp; One of its intents is to generate enough of an income for me to live the life I want to live (and this barely works -- which is great for me, since I make enough money to live a life I love!).&nbsp; I also have the final word on what decisions are made.&nbsp; What I've just written above could, conceivably describe a group that calls itself a hackerspace (though it isn't one I would want to be a part of).&nbsp; Most hackerspaces primary intent is to encourage people to explore the things they like to do that they love doing.&nbsp; And if they make money from it as a&nbsp;result, then that's great.&nbsp; This last sentence actually does describe my project, TV-B-Gone -- since it was (and is) a project that I did primarily because I wanted one, and I thought it would be way cool to make it available for others so that they could have fun turning TVs off (and have time to actually have a life, rather than just drool in front of a piece of furniture for hours every day).&nbsp; Maybe I could have created a group of people who collectively ran the TV-B-Gone business when it became an overnight hit, but the way it actually happened was that me and the friends who worked on TV-B-Gone continued the way we had started -- I came up with the main ideas, others pitched in with lots of great ideas, making my ideas better, and I had the final say on how to proceed, based on what everyone else contributed (and with every decision I made, I tried to make sure that every one was happy with it).&nbsp; But running a company is way more stressful than being part of a hackerspace.&nbsp; One of the main reasons is that a lot of peoples' means of subsistence (i.e., their income) is riding on all the decisions.&nbsp; This is why one of the hackerspace design patterns is about hackerspaces being not-for-profit -- it takes a lot of pressure off of peoples' decision-making, and allows for most of the energy to go into creating a space that encourages people to explore things they love to do (and share it and teach it and learn from others).<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
In my travels, I have met a lot of people who have found creative ways of making a living as a result of exploring projects they love at hackerspaces.&nbsp; I think that is&nbsp;one great thing about hackerspaces!<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
I encourage people, everywhere I go, to make time to explore what they love doing.&nbsp; I think that there are lots of creative ways (which are different for each person) to find creative ways to make enough money to live a life you really want to live, and that can be based on project(s) that you love to work/play with.&nbsp; And hackerspaces are great for this (as I've said).&nbsp; (I also encourage people to quit their jobs if they don't like them, and want to create time to explore more opportunities for making a living doing what you really love -- but I only do this if an individual wants me to -- so, if you want encouragement to quit a job you don't love, please ask me to poke you to quit your job!)<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
So, hang out at hackerspaces.&nbsp; Start your own if one isn't close (enough) to you!&nbsp; It can only make your life cooler, and the lives of those around you cooler.&nbsp; And maybe you'll even find a way to make a living from it!<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
Mitch.<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
<BR>---------------------------&nbsp;<BR>&gt; Date: Mon, 1 Mar 2010 18:06:54 +0100<BR>&gt; From: nuno.morgadinho@gmail.com<BR>&gt; To: noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net<BR>&gt; Subject: [Noisebridge-discuss] Hackerspaces and Companies: Where they differ and where they overlap<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Hi guys,<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; I'm doing a research work titled "Hackerspaces and Companies: Where<BR>&gt; they differ and where they overlap". It's about what aspects of a<BR>&gt; Hackerspace could one borrow and apply to a company. Does anyone have<BR>&gt; anything to say about this?<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Is it possible to operate a company under the same principles as a<BR>&gt; Hackerspace? What would be the main obstacles?<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; I know some of you will probably go sky rocket with such absurd<BR>&gt; questions but please bare with me. The real reason behind my work is<BR>&gt; that I would like to be all the time at a Hackerspace :) but I still<BR>&gt; have to pay bills at the end of the month :(<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Thanks for any inputs,<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; p.s. I'm not a member of Noisebridge but I started subscribing and<BR>&gt; following the mailing list after seeing a talk by Mitch Altman.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; -- <BR>&gt; Nuno Morgadinho<BR>&gt; http://www.morgadinho.org<BR>&gt; http://twitter.com/morgadin<BR>&gt; _______________________________________________<BR>&gt; Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<BR>&gt; Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net<BR>&gt; https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss<BR>                                               </body>
</html>