<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">This is going to be a wonderful event, and the first in a series connected to Phasor~, our data flow working group here at Noisebridge. &nbsp;The "Max" in Max/MSP is named for Mr. Mathews. His work is a part of the foundation we stand on.<br><br>No RSVP necessary, but for those of the Facebook persuasion, we have an invite here with more info on the event:<br><a href="http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=350323874141">http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=350323874141</a><br><br>Vlad<br><br><br>+dialog symposia series<br>presented by RML SF, Gray Area Foundation for the Arts, and Phasor~<br><br>Friday, March 19, 02010<br>7-9 PM<br>Gray Area Foundation for the Arts<br>55 Taylor St. San Francisco<br><br>Suggested Donation to our host Gray Area $5-10 – No one turned away for lack of funds.<br><br>The RML SF +dialog symposia series fosters discussion and interaction between audiences and artists, authors, theorists, educators, and producers of cutting-edge work.<br><br>Trace the history of the most important song in computer music through two groundbreaking renditions. Max Mathews, the father of computer music, and new media artists Aaron Koblin and Daniel Massey, will give presentations about their interpretations of the classic song followed by a open discussion moderated by digital arts technologist Barry Threw.<br><br>Some background for the event:<br><br>Computer performance of music was born in 1957 when Max Mathews made an IBM 704 at Bell Labs play a 17 second composition on the Music I program.<br><br>In 1962 Mathews synthesized the music for the song “Daisy Bell”, originally written by Harry Dacre in 1892, as an accompaniment for a vocoder speech synthesizer created by John L. Kelly. Arthur C. Clarke, then visiting friend and colleague John Pierce at the Bell Labs Murray Hill facility, saw this remarkable demonstration and later used it in the climactic scene of his novel and screenplay for “2001: A Space Odyssey” as the swan song of the dying computer, HAL9000.<br><br>In 2009, the online work Bicycle Built For Two Thousand by artists Aaron Koblin and Daniel Massey took this first recording and created a crowd-sourced rendition using a custom tool made in Processing. Comprised of over 2,000 voice recordings collected via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk web service, participants were asked to listen to a short sound clip and record themselves imitating what they heard. The result was a reconstructed version of the song as rendered by a distributed system of human voices. Instead of programming a computer, they used a computer program to stitch together a cross section of humanity.</body></html>