<html>
<head>
<style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 10pt;
font-family:Verdana
}
--></style>
</head>
<body class='hmmessage'>
There's a big TV-B-Gone fan who just retired as a technician from CBS (yeah, lots of people&nbsp;who work in TV are TV-B-Gone fans).&nbsp; He just sent me his idea of&nbsp;how&nbsp;he thinks the Toyota accelerator pedal works, and what he thinks goes wrong with this design.<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
The attached diagram is a crude sketch of how the accelerator is supposed to work (assuming attachments&nbsp;get through to the list).&nbsp;<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
Just thought folks might be interested.<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
Mitch.<BR>
<BR>&nbsp;<BR>
 <BR>&gt; -------- Original Message --------<BR>&gt; Subject: Toyota<BR>&gt; Date: Sat, 03 Apr 2010 21:34:01 -0400<BR>&gt; From: georgenann@aol.com<BR>&gt; To: mitch@cornfieldelectronics.com<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Hi Mitch,<BR>&gt;<BR>
&gt; Here is what I think may be in the little box connected to the gas <BR>&gt; pedal. Hope you don't mind a quickly drawn diagram, I am no artist. Also <BR>&gt; the terminology may not be correct, but I'm sure you will get the idea.<BR>&gt; For lack of a better term, the "tone wheel" can be almost any kind of <BR>&gt; toothed device which can generate pulses when passed thru an <BR>&gt; optocoupler, or any other type of device, IE: Hall effect stuff, etc.<BR>&gt; Opto coupler (A) generates pulses, no matter which way the tone wheel is <BR>&gt; turned. Opto coupler (B) is 90 degrees out of phase from opto coupler <BR>&gt; (A) and with either simple logic or software in the computer, will <BR>&gt; generate either a high or low depending on which direction it is turned. <BR>&gt; Then the computer will either count up or down, causing the engine to <BR>&gt; speed up or slow down.<BR>&gt;<BR>
&gt; I think the problem may be in the hi or low signal as derived from the <BR>&gt; two optocouplers. If it is stuck in the hi mode, a driver could have <BR>&gt; the pedal halfway down, then take his foot off and the pulses generated <BR>&gt; by optocoupler (A) will still cause the computer to speed up, not slow <BR>&gt; down. Any further motion of the pedal in either direction will cause <BR>&gt; the engine to speed up even more.<BR>&gt;<BR>
&gt; Any angular movement of either optocoupler will cause a failure of this <BR>&gt; type, it could go either way, either speeding up or slowing down. The <BR>&gt; problem may be from just a bad led or fototransistor in the opto <BR>&gt; couplers or if the tone wheel is too small even a slight position change <BR>&gt; would result in in a failure of the up/down signal. There are plugs <BR>&gt; involved also.<BR>&gt;<BR>
&gt; The first time I ran into this type of circuit, many years ago was in <BR>&gt; the Sony BVH 1100 video tape machine. The FF/Rewind knob worked in this <BR>&gt; way. When the opto couplers weren't positioned correctly all hell would <BR>&gt; break loose, resulting in little bits of tape all over the place. Most <BR>&gt; digital tuning on ham gear is the same type system as is the volume <BR>&gt; control on most car radios nowadays. Just about all video tape machines <BR>&gt; have the same thing as do some vcr's.<BR>&gt;<BR>
&gt; There was some wing ding professor on TV saying that most of the <BR>&gt; accidents were under power lines and they were interfering with the <BR>&gt; computer, but it seems that if that were the case the speed and <BR>&gt; operation of the engine would be impaired, not speeding up. Toyota has <BR>&gt; come out with a fix in which a brake override was added so that if the <BR>&gt; engine is going fast and you hit the brake the engine would slow down. <BR>&gt; That is a good idea, but it tells me my idea may be the real culprit.<BR>&gt;<BR>
&gt; I know this is just a rough description of the system as I see it, but <BR>&gt; you should have no trouble doping it out.<BR>&gt;<BR>
&gt; 73,<BR>&gt; George Keller<BR><BR>                                               </body>
</html>