(Extra tag added to help sort David Fine&#39;s inbox.)<div><br></div><div>The act of actually blocking a consensus decision is something very rare indeed and indicates that communication has completely broken down on a subject.  This is why it should be a truly rare thing.</div>
<div><br></div><div>That process can break down at either end - generally if it comes to that, the member who has the objection&#39;s voice is being ignored, although an uncommunicative member suddenly throwing a block out without having mentioned any objection in advance is an equivalent breakdown in communication.  In short, it should be clear that everyone pretty much agrees before we have something up for formal consensus.</div>
<div><br></div><div>This doesn&#39;t mean that you would stake your membership on an issue you disagree with.  It does mean that you should be reasonable and considerate of others&#39; desires and needs, and most importantly time.  If you disagree with something and can convince those who are supporting it that it&#39;s not what we should do, then that&#39;s a reasonable outcome from this sort of discussion.</div>
<div><br></div><div>With the example of the piano, those who think a piano would be a noise problem and not in line with Noisebridge&#39;s objectives could probably, and probably will, convince those (myself included) that think having a piano around would be pretty neat that it would be more problem than value to the space.  </div>
<div><br></div><div>No threats are being made, no reputations are being staked, just a thoughtful discussion on what&#39;s best for everyone.</div><div><br></div><div>But that has me thinking about maybe getting a piano in at the warehouse where I live, if they&#39;re so cheap to come by.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Christie</div><div>_______<br>&quot;We also briefly discussed having officers replaced by very small shell scripts.&quot; -- Noisebridge meeting notes 2008-06-17<br><br>The outer bounds is only the beginning. <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/genriel/sets/72157623376093724/">http://www.flickr.com/photos/genriel/sets/72157623376093724/</a><br>

<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Apr 8, 2010 at 6:17 PM, Andy Isaacson <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:adi@hexapodia.org">adi@hexapodia.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">On Thu, Apr 08, 2010 at 06:11:38PM -0700, Ian Atha wrote:<br>
&gt; &gt; For the time being I will block on any notion to bring an acoustic piano<br>
&gt; &gt; to Noisebridge. It&#39;s not a good use of the space.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; When I started coming to Noisebridge I was told that the convention is<br>
<br>
</div>Yeah, I really deplore the quick deployment of &quot;block&quot;.  It&#39;s like<br>
saying (not in jest) &quot;I&#39;ll sue you&quot;; in a well-functioning consensus<br>
process, a block should be a once-a-year or once-a-decade event across<br>
the entire community, a final resort which is available to any member<br>
precisely because it&#39;s never used lightly.<br>
<br>
This isn&#39;t to pick on David specifically; I&#39;ve heard similar statements<br>
from other members over the last months.<br>
<br>
Raising your concerns about a proposed action or acquisition or space<br>
usage is great; it opens discussion and allows others to meet you<br>
halfway.  Closing down discussion with the utter finality of deploying<br>
the nuclear option is disheartening and depressing and ultimately<br>
detrimental to our community.<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
-andy<br>
</font><div><div></div><div class="h5">_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>