If you are interested in physical security. I recommend checking out &quot;Security Engineering: <span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small; ">A Guide to Building Dependable Distributed Systems&quot; (Ross Anderson, Wiley)</span><div>
<span id="btAsinTitle"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: small;"><br></span></font></span></div><div><span id="btAsinTitle"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: small;">It covers computer security, but also things like metering, electronic eavesdropping, physical tampering, drm, telecom. I think this is a good book if you want a general overview of these fields. Its a good starting place for those interested. </span></font></span></div>
<div><span id="btAsinTitle"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: small;"><br></span></font></span></div><div><span id="btAsinTitle"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: small;">I believe there is a copy on the Noisebridge bookshelf.</span></font></span></div>
<div><span id="btAsinTitle"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: small;"><br></span></font></span></div><div><span id="btAsinTitle"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: small;">The 1st edition is available online at: <a href="http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/book.html">http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/book.html</a></span></font></span></div>
<div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; "><br></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: small;"><br>
</span></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: small;">-Miah </span></span></div></span><br><div class="gmail_quote">
On Tue, May 4, 2010 at 4:19 PM, Bryan Beeley <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:bryan@beeley.org">bryan@beeley.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
Here is an interesting video of a talk that goes over a number of<br>
problems in how physical security systems are designed, evaluated and<br>
installed.  These are the systems that control opening and closing doors<br>
in government buildings, schools and office buildings.  The talk focuses<br>
on vulnerabilities in S2 Security physical security devices.  He starts<br>
talking about the actual vulnerability around 15 minutes into the talk.<br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.securityinfowatch.com/The+Security+Check/penetration-testing-electronic-door-access-control-systems" target="_blank">http://www.securityinfowatch.com/The+Security+Check/penetration-testing-electronic-door-access-control-systems</a><br>

<br>
The talk is a little slow, but I found there were a number of<br>
interesting tidbits pointing toward potential vulnerabilities in other<br>
physical security devices and poorly designed embedded devices in general.<br>
<br>
Bryan<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
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</blockquote></div><br>