<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div>The Atari 2600 did have to play with some old ass TV standards, but I think one of the weird bits you're referring to is the alternating of drawn frames between one layer of graphics and another. The 2600 could only draw so many "sprites" in one frame, so you'd just render two separate frames and switch between them really fast.</div><div><br></div><div>The NES emulator I linked in the previous email certainly does this, because the NES did this, too. If you want to start banging your head against it, the NES emulator is up on Git Hub, at&nbsp;<a href="http://github.com/bfirsh/jsnes/">http://github.com/bfirsh/jsnes/</a>&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><br><div><div>On May 22, 2010, at 9:13 PM, Jack Perkins wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite">I'd be extremely interested in learning about how one would go about doing this. Specifically because the Television Interface Adapter chip for the 2600 is so strange. What I know about it is all from <a href="http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&amp;tid=11696">http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&amp;tid=11696</a> which I suggest both as a technical guide and as a artistic criticism of the early video game industry. The possibility of writing a 2600 interpreter that runs on the web is really exciting to me. I'm a javascript noob, but learning it is one of my current goals, so this couldn't be a better opportunity. <br>

<br>-Jack<br><br></blockquote></div><br></body></html>