Both ICP and Keats are making the assumption that one cannot be amazed and wowed if a purely analytical perspective of the universe is taken.† Instead, we are freed from superstition and allowed to turn our wondering eyes to newer and deeper mysteries.<br>
<br>My present fascination is the mind of a child, and the depths, there in, are galactic in scale compared to the mysteries of gnome filled mines.† And these are depths that have been explored by every (well, most...ok, maybe just a few) parent since the first creature with a brain evolved enough to wonder reflected upon her child.<br>
<br>Wear body armor<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Jun 1, 2010 at 6:03 PM, Jonathan Foote <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jtfoote@ieee.org">jtfoote@ieee.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
Keats still said it better:<br>
<br>
...Do not all charms fly<br>
At the mere touch of cold philosophy?<br>
There was an awful rainbow once in heaven:<br>
We know her woof, her texture; she is given<br>
In the dull catalogue of common things.<br>
Philosophy will clip an Angelís wings,<br>
Conquer all mysteries by rule and line,<br>
Empty the haunted air, and gnomed mineó<br>
Unweave a rainbow, as it erewhile made<br>
The tender-personíd Lamia melt into a shade.</blockquote></div>