<html xmlns:v="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40">

<head>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=us-ascii">
<meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Word 11 (filtered medium)">
<!--[if !mso]>
<style>
v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
.shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
</style>
<![endif]-->
<style>
<!--
 /* Font Definitions */
 @font-face
        {font-family:Batang;
        panose-1:2 3 6 0 0 1 1 1 1 1;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Tahoma;
        panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}
@font-face
        {font-family:"\@Batang";}
 /* Style Definitions */
 p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0in;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
span.EmailStyle17
        {mso-style-type:personal-reply;
        font-family:Arial;
        color:navy;}
@page Section1
        {size:8.5in 11.0in;
        margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in;}
div.Section1
        {page:Section1;}
-->
</style>

</head>

<body lang=EN-US link=blue vlink=blue>

<div class=Section1>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=navy face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'>Since a peltier junction is a big hunk of
metal (and not a semiconductor), and it won't draw variable amounts of power, I
guess you don't need any capacitors to smooth out the power.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=navy face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=navy face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'>Your 24volt 4.5 amp power supply will only
be able to supply 12 volts 4.5 amps with a voltage regulator. It won't be able
to supply more amperage. &nbsp;Also note the voltage regulator I pointed to isn't
rated for 4.5 amps. The regulator is liable to overheat. I -think- it's ok to
put 2 voltage regulators in parallel to up the amperage ability but I don't
know for sure. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=navy face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=navy face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=navy face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'>Have fun freezing/burning the castle!<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=navy face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=navy face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=navy face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=navy face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=navy face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=navy face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>

<div>

<div class=MsoNormal align=center style='text-align:center'><font size=3
face="Times New Roman"><span style='font-size:12.0pt'>

<hr size=2 width="100%" align=center tabindex=-1>

</span></font></div>

<p class=MsoNormal><b><font size=2 face=Tahoma><span style='font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:Tahoma;font-weight:bold'>From:</span></font></b><font size=2
face=Tahoma><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Tahoma'>
noisebridge-discuss-bounces@lists.noisebridge.net
[mailto:noisebridge-discuss-bounces@lists.noisebridge.net] <b><span
style='font-weight:bold'>On Behalf Of </span></b>Sean Cusack<br>
<b><span style='font-weight:bold'>Sent:</span></b> Thursday, July 01, 2010 6:03
PM<br>
<b><span style='font-weight:bold'>To:</span></b> Ryan Castellucci<br>
<b><span style='font-weight:bold'>Cc:</span></b>
&lt;noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net&gt;<br>
<b><span style='font-weight:bold'>Subject:</span></b> Re: [Noisebridge-discuss]
N00b question - changing power supplyvoltage</span></font><o:p></o:p></p>

</div>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=3 face="Times New Roman"><span style='font-size:
12.0pt'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal style='margin-bottom:12.0pt'><font size=3
face="Times New Roman"><span style='font-size:12.0pt'>Awesome - thanks guys!<br>
<br>
I'm going to try to use this guy to power a peltier cooler (I've got a sweet
idea here depending on how well I can get this doo-hickey to work). It takes
12V at up to 9A, but from the reading I've been doing, it looks like you want
to stay away from the top value of amperage anyways. I'll give it a spin with
just the 4.5A first to see how it works.<br>
<br>
Based on what I'm seeing below, if I use 2 voltage regulators in parallel, it
looks like that should handle the current without a problem. I can totally drop
in a cap after the fact to smooth out the current. Ryan - I'm considering doing
an ATX PSU mod too...I've got an extra one laying around.<br>
<br>
Sean<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<div>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=3 face="Times New Roman"><span style='font-size:
12.0pt'>On Thu, Jul 1, 2010 at 5:05 PM, Ryan Castellucci &lt;<a
href="mailto:ryan.castellucci@gmail.com">ryan.castellucci@gmail.com</a>&gt;
wrote:<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=3 face="Times New Roman"><span style='font-size:
12.0pt'>How much current are you drawing? &nbsp;TBH, you should really just go
to<br>
weird stuff and pick one up for a few dollars. &nbsp;Another option would<br>
be converting an ATX power supply to a bench supply.<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

<div>

<div>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=3 face="Times New Roman"><span style='font-size:
12.0pt'><br>
On Thu, Jul 1, 2010 at 1:57 PM, Sean Cusack &lt;<a
href="mailto:sean.p.cusack@gmail.com">sean.p.cusack@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt; Hey kids -<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; So, I've got a relatively simple dilemma that I sure pops up all the time<br>
&gt; for those of you that are way better at electronics than me. I've got a<br>
&gt; power supply providing a fixed 24V @ 4.5A, but I only want to use 12V of<br>
&gt; that for my circuit. I originally thought I could lower the voltage using
a<br>
&gt; potentiometer, but because the power is so high, they all cost some
serious<br>
&gt; bank. Is there another (not necessarily analog) solution to changing
voltage<br>
&gt; and/or amperage through a circuit that is cheap to build?<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Sorry if this one is likely obvious - but everyone can blame Mitch for<br>
&gt; getting me way to into electronics for my own good :).<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Sean<br>
&gt;<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

</div>

</div>

<div>

<div>

<p class=MsoNormal style='margin-bottom:12.0pt'><font size=3
face="Times New Roman"><span style='font-size:12.0pt'>&gt;
_______________________________________________<br>
&gt; Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
&gt; <a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
&gt; <a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss"
target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
<br>
<br>
<o:p></o:p></span></font></p>

</div>

</div>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=3 color="#888888" face="Times New Roman"><span
style='font-size:12.0pt;color:#888888'>--<br>
Ryan Castellucci <a href="http://ryanc.org/" target="_blank">http://ryanc.org/</a></span></font><o:p></o:p></p>

</div>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=3 face="Times New Roman"><span style='font-size:
12.0pt'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>

</div>

</body>

</html>