<a href="http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=527">http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=527</a> times 18?  That sounds like a bit much.  Maybe there&#39;s a better regulator.<br>
<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Jul 6, 2010 at 10:14 AM, Corey McGuire <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:coreyfro@coreyfro.com">coreyfro@coreyfro.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
This is the best back-of-napkin application I&#39;ve seen for TEJ&#39;s, ever and a 24v power supply is the perfect supply for it.<br><br>There are two problems I see:<br><ol><li>When you cycle them to maintain a temperature, the heat you moved to one side will quickly conduct back to the other.</li>

<li>In this process, a charge will be created and sent down the wire.</li></ol>How you handle this is a mystery to me.<br><br>Here&#39;s what I would do.  I would NOT wire them in series.  Instead, I would implement switching power supplies and use them to keep the TEJ&#39;s active at 16v when cooling or a lower voltage while maintaining the desired temperature.  Then I would switch them relative to how far below the desired temperature they are.  Any temp above desired, 16v; 1 degree below, 12v; 3 degrees below, 8v... or whatever.<br>

<br>I would NOT overdrive them because I imagine they just get even LESS efficient.<br><br>1 arduino<br>1 temperature probe<br>a fist full of switching power supplies<br>a capacitor just to keep power going to the TEJ to help resist the heat moving backward (I don&#39;t know if this is a problem, but it is a cheap solution.)<br>

whatever else (I am not even pretending to be an EE.)<br><br>YMMV<div><div></div><div class="h5"><br><br><br><br><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Jul 6, 2010 at 9:35 AM, Sean Cusack <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:sean.p.cusack@gmail.com" target="_blank">sean.p.cusack@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">Oh yes...I know they are terrible at efficiency...but they are also the only thing that I know of that can get you to sub-ambient temperatures without using a (comparatively) giant refrigeration system.<br>

<br>I&#39;m planning on using these to cool a few pieces of lab equipment. Typically, to get to sub ambient conditions, you have to use ice/water (gets you to 0C), or dry ice/acetone (gets you to -78C), or full on Liquid N2 which gets you too cold for most practical applications. It would be *awesome* to hit like -20 or -10 or even 5C repeatedly and controllably for a million and one different chemical reactions. <br>



<br>There is equipment that allows you to do this now, but pretty much its a standalone refrigeration system that pumps cooled silicon based oil through your reaction mixture. It takes up a ton of room on my bench, and since those refrigerators are on the order of $7k a pop, its tough to convince my boss to allow me to buy more than about 2 of them. In other words, longer hours for Sean in the lab = teh sux.<br>



<br>So, I&#39;m trying to use these doodads as a way to run a bunch of reactions at a controllably cold temperature. I agree there&#39;s problems, but given the application, it may just work!<br><font color="#888888"><br>

Sean</font><div><div></div><div><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">

On Tue, Jul 6, 2010 at 8:44 AM, Jonathan Foote <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jtfoote@ieee.org" target="_blank">jtfoote@ieee.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">



<div>On Tue, Jul 6, 2010 at 4:17 AM, Corey McGuire &lt;<a href="mailto:coreyfro@coreyfro.com" target="_blank">coreyfro@coreyfro.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
<br>
&gt; Messy, messy stuff.  TEJ&#39;s are not efficient.  This is fine by themselves.  When you stage them, their inefficiencies &gt; become readily apparent as they begin to compound.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; May I ask what you intend to do with them?<br>
<br>
</div>Yeah, also curious. Corey is absolutely right: TEJs have terrible<br>
Carnot efficiency --  way less than 10%. This means to move (not<br>
remove) 5 watts of heat you have to put in 50+ watts of power, which<br>
turns into heat you ALSO need to remove.<br>
<br>
So they are only useful in a few applications where the small temp<br>
difference over a tiny scale is worth the waste. If they really were<br>
the magic refrigerators people think they are, they would be in every<br>
PC and laptop. And note that if you are trying to keep things cool,<br>
there may be far better solutions.<br>
<br>
&quot;In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics!&quot;<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
-J<br>
</font><div><div></div><div>_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net" target="_blank">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>
</div></div><br>_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net" target="_blank">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><div style="margin: 2em 0pt;" name="sig_6c93747201"><br></div><br>