<p>I have no idea if there is truth to the claim that the names of afghan informants and allies were leaked.</p>
<p>If it is true, it would be my contention that such a leak constitutes a breach of wikileaks commitment to harm minimization.  If they made a mistake they should ostensibly address that with contrition and a statement of their continued intent to minimize harm.</p>

<p>That is my concern with recent events.</p>
<p>-Matt</p>
<p><blockquote type="cite">On Aug 2, 2010 4:45 PM, &quot;Curly Wurly&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:curlywurly22987@gmail.com">curlywurly22987@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br><br><p><font color="#500050">On Mon, Aug 2, 2010 at 12:47 PM, Quinn Norton &lt;<a href="mailto:quinn@quinnnorton.com">quinn@quinnnorton.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
</font></p><p><font color="#500050">&gt; yes, journalists wrestle with this sort of thing, but sometimes even in more straightforward journ...</font></p>In other words, the end justifies the means.  Why do journalists think<br>

they have that right?<br>
<br>
Instead of looking at the larger issue of the wars in total, the<br>
reductionist in me boils it down to these assumptions:<br>
<br>
1.) Assume there&#39;s a great injustice in the world.<br>
2.) Assume I have a document, which when published could end that injustice.<br>
3.) Assume that publishing the document will result in the execution<br>
of John and Jane Doe.<br>
<br>
I wouldn&#39;t publish it.<br>
<br>
If you take a holistic view and pull in justifications such as how<br>
unjust point 1 is, I think the debate gets cloudy.  Sticking with this<br>
reductionist exposition, would anyone choose to publish it?<br>
<p><font color="#500050"><br><br>&gt; there was also a danger of discovery which each and every person who worked with the occupiers, ...</font></p>I agree.<br>
<p><font color="#500050">_______________________________________________<br>Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>Noisebridge-discuss...</font></p></blockquote></p>