Actually I think that the reverse engineering efforts could exist regardless of the &quot;hackerspace olympic games&quot; (and be part of it, whenever it happens). I&#39;ve been talking to some people trying to setup a website for that kind of collaborative documentation of not officially documented hardware.<br>
<br>Anyone here interested in brainstorming about it? What tools would be useful in such a website in order to enable people to share their discoveries about hardware inner workings?<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Aug 10, 2010 at 5:23 AM, Felipe Sanches <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:juca@members.fsf.org">juca@members.fsf.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">I&#39;d like to suggest a reverse engineering category in this hacker competitions event.<br>
<br>It would be similar to what somebody mentioned about disassembling a C64, but with hardware that we still dont have much knowledge about. The task would be to write documentation (like a wiki page?) with photos, schematics, links to available datasheets, theories of how it may work internally and of what may be the function of each component in the device. <br>

<br>All of these things could be understood as a collaborative effort towards better understanding of the electronic devices that surround us. And it would have the competitive struggle aspect also since we would be competing against the secrecy practiced by hardware manufacturers who deny us knowledge about these devices (and thus, deny us the ability to control/repurpose them).<br>

<br>The outputs of these rev.eng. sprints would be useful for other activities such as actual creation of new uses for these devices. The &quot;repurposing&quot; category in the competition would benefit of all of this documentation effort.<br>

<br>Felipe &quot;Juca&quot; Sanches<br>Hackerspace São Paulo - Brazil (upcoming)
</blockquote></div><br>