<div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Aug 22, 2010 at 2:14 PM, Paul Suliin <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:psuliin@gmail.com">psuliin@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<br>Josh, what sorts of cultural things do you mean?  At the moment I&#39;m studying for the exam using books provided by ARRL, so there&#39;s not much of a cultural aspect to that.  <br><br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>
Mostly the jargon, so you can sensibly talk about radios and the weather on internet-linked 2m/70cm repeaters.  Also, the thorough appreciation that most hams are at a point in life where the most exciting thing going on is the cure for their wife&#39;s foot fungus (true story, overheard on a local repeater, probably via IRLP, even).</div>
<div><br></div><div>There are a lot of little rules in amateur radio.  Imagine noisebridge, but without the anarchist/libertarian/common-sense consensus process.  Nerds like rules, and, without a structure that makes it hard to create rules, they will make lots of them.  Happily, very few of them are actually legally enforced, but it&#39;s best not to piss off the community.  This includes stuff like running digital over a CW frequency, etc.  (Elmers will say that bandplans exist to conserve precious spectrum; if more than 10% of the band is in use simultaneously around here, I&#39;d be surprised.)</div>
<div><br></div><div>The ARRL books might actually cover this; I&#39;m not sure.  The key thing to always remember: don&#39;t piss off the Country Kitchen set, and you&#39;re good.</div><div><br></div><div>(All that said: I&#39;m planning to get my General soon, and ordered the ARRL Extra book.)</div>
<div><br></div><div>73 de KJ6ANM</div><div>--</div><div>/jbm</div></div>