Coming from &quot;super&quot; exclusive nycr ( and as such NYC )... but more importantly, as a well... me, I will say this.  Picking out the crazies isn&#39;t too hard.  Whether it&#39;s walking alone on a street at 3 am, or just hanging out in team noisebridge most of us have some pretty awesome vestigial animal instincts.  You just gotta listen to em and act on them responsibly.  <br>
<br>It&#39;s not too hard to spot someone who is really straight up off.  And if that just means firing of some &quot;hey I need an assist&#39; message.  Do so.  Better safe than sorry, and no one can / should fault you for that.  If you are in real trouble people will respond.  Just let em know.  But odds are you have some room to work with.  If it ends up being nothing at all, that&#39;s okay too.  Don&#39;t be embarrassed.  It&#39;s perfectly okay to edge on the side of caution so long as you do so responsibly.  <br>
<br>Staying calm is vital.  Not just for you, but as stated earlier... it keeps them at ease as well.  The idea is to avoid escalation.. as it is in any conflict.  Emanate calm, and emanate authority.   Easier to do when you actually believe in yourself... so do that.  No regrets and such.  Once you are in that zone, you can&#39;t be better than the situation.  You have done the best you can.<br>
<br>While mental illness is tragic, it is also sometimes ( luckily not very often ) dangerous.  Not just to you, but to others ( including the person who is ill ).  Don&#39;t be afraid to take action.  As I said before, regret is a pretty horrible thing, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with wanting the best for people.  Road to hell and such being paved with good intentions is so much bullshit.  You do the best you can with what you have.  If you have done that, you&#39;ve done nothing wrong.<br>
<br>Most police / emergency services have experience dealing with folks who are unstable.  Sometimes there is the rare exception, but as it turns out, in cities like NYC and SFO this is pretty much their bread and butter.  They tend to have a pretty good understanding of the situation and are total professionals about it.  Try to have some faith in your fellow man.  EMTs especially deserve your trust here.  They know what&#39;s possible and will do the best they can.<br>
<br>It sucks that things like schizophrenia exist.  A good friend of mine was diagnosed with it out of college.  There are treatments, but there are no cures.  It&#39;s a horrible thing to see someone go through.  Don&#39;t mistake it for some &quot;alternate perspective&quot;.  It is a horrible illness that hurts people, and the people that care about them.  You do what you can, but you learn pretty early on, that there is only so much you can do.  And while that is gut wrenching, it&#39;s just one more hurdle we&#39;ve yet to jump and we&#39;ll just have to suffer it.<br>
<br>Be careful always, but as I said earlier, regret sucks hard.  Don&#39;t put yourself in that position.  Do what you think is right, and hope it works out for the best.  If you get that far, you should be fine regardless of the outcome.<br>
<br><br><br>  <br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Sep 20, 2010 at 8:59 PM, Sai <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:noisebridge@saizai.com">noisebridge@saizai.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="im">On Mon, Sep 20, 2010 at 2:46 PM, Thomas Stowe &lt;<a href="mailto:stowe.thomas@gmail.com">stowe.thomas@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt; From an outsider (me), I&#39;d say that any person you didn&#39;t recognize would be<br>
&gt; &quot;new&quot; and if they stated that they didn&#39;t need help, either they&#39;d be lying<br>
&gt; or a member. You could always ask their name as they come in if you didn&#39;t<br>
&gt; recognize them on the camera and check a registry.<br>
<br>
</div>I think that this is unlikely to work. We tend to be, if anything, a<br>
bit rabid about the whole privacy thing. (Remember the flamefest over<br>
the idea that there might be logging of who visits when?) I&#39;m on the<br>
moderate side, but even I&#39;d be a bit creeped out by that.<br>
<br>
Also, people could easily be new but not need help, which is a tertium<br>
quid you neglected. Not everybody wants a tour / project / whatever<br>
when they come in. I think it&#39;s friendly to notice people who look<br>
new, ask if they&#39;ve been by before and if they&#39;d like a tour or a<br>
project to work on.<br>
<br>
But as a security measure? Not really.<br>
<br>
Really, this is one of those things about the NB model of openness;<br>
since we&#39;re against pre-screening we have to just deal with shit as it<br>
comes up.<br>
<br>
Which, y&#39;know, is surprisingly rare considering how trusting we are<br>
(e.g. basically anyone can come in and use expensive, dangerous,<br>
and/or fragile tools without us even knowing their name). There&#39;ve<br>
been, what, maybe four or so incidents in the last two years, and all<br>
of them handled quickly and relatively easily?<br>
<br>
Most people are pretty awesome, IME. That welcomeness is worth the<br>
cost of enforcement-after-the-fact.<br>
<br>
- Sai<br>
<br>
PS Your sig is still lulzy.<br>
<br>
Notice: Unless you are named &quot;Arnold P. Fasnock&quot;, you may read only<br>
the &quot;odd numbered words&quot; (every other word beginning with the first)<br>
of the message above. If you have violated that, then you hereby owe<br>
the sender $10 for each even numbered word you have read.<br>
<div><div></div><div class="h5">_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>