<div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Sep 23, 2010 at 1:11 PM, Mitch Altman <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:maltman23@hotmail.com">maltman23@hotmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div><div><div class="h5">
 <br></div></div>
The last time a film crew was there they were shooting me, and the results were actually pretty good <a href="http://www.vimby.com/video/sponsor/us/all/detail/10908/Take_on_the_Machine_Episode_One/" target="_blank">http://www.vimby.com/video/sponsor/us/all/detail/10908/Take_on_the_Machine_Episode_One/</a>.  But it did take a lot of takes to get a sequence without some extra noise.<br>
<font color="#888888">
 <br></font></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>The producer(?) was a bit less-than-thrilled when he came out to ask us to talk really quietly for just a few more minutes, right before you guys headed into the noisebridge sound studio (read: elevator).  And it wasn&#39;t like there were lots of people, or anyone was being loud.  Vonguard&#39;s not the softest spoken of people and all, but he&#39;s quieter than I am on a conference call.</div>
<div><br></div><div>A lot of the audio in that video sounds a tad off; it could be a funny mic or the acoustics of the elevator car, but I think it&#39;s probably dynamic compression to remove background noise from NB, which I understand to be a rather tedious process if one does it carefully.  Then again, it&#39;s what production crews get paid for.  Careful micing would make a difference, too: the maker faire segments sound really great and natural, so they might have just left the right microphone at home.</div>
<div><br></div><div>I think it&#39;s really important to help production folks understand the environment they&#39;re stepping into.</div><div>--</div><div>/jbm</div></div>