I am sure you are right that TOR has been compromised.  I would suggest taking a look at the source <a href="http://www.torproject.org/download.html.en">http://www.torproject.org/download.html.en</a>.  You can download it there and then confirm or deny this.  It should be fairly trivial for you to do this.  A lot of other projects are open source as well that you can use for encryption on top of tor (a vpn service over tor for example if you are super paranoid)  Other than that you are right, you should NEVER do something that you wouldn&#39;t do in the open over tor or any other service.  It is just douchy and well wrong.  <div>
<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Sep 27, 2010 at 9:33 PM, Thomas Stowe <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:stowe.thomas@gmail.com">stowe.thomas@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<font size="2"><font face="verdana,sans-serif">There&#39;s a bit of an educated guess that I agree with that Tor is compromised. The Navy was doing stuff with it and then there were some documents leaked to wikileaks because of an exit-point exploit and I&#39;d hazard to guess that anyone after that would&#39;ve used the power of authority to cause the EFF and others to put backdoors in their privacy software and also full access to source. There are a few softwares like JAP (Jondonym) that have been required to put a backdoor in that can be activated with a warrant. Given the FBI&#39;s history of illegal wiretaps and overzealous behavior of companies hired to track down piracy sites and large groups of pirates I&#39;d hazard to guess that Tor, VyprVPN, HideMyAss and everything else is compromised. This guess gives me enough pause that I&#39;d suggest that you don&#39;t do anything stupid that you&#39;re afraid to get caught doing, ever. If you can find a fool-proof anonymity plan, it&#39;s going to be illegal. Almost all ways to get high speed Internet access anonymously are illegal and if you do something via Tor, they&#39;re essentially going to go after the exit-point&#39;s owner which is another Tor user offering anonymity services so not only are you doing something stupid but you&#39;re putting the blame on someone else for what you did. There&#39;ve been cases of Child Porn investigations and raids on innocent people because they were running Tor servers who almost faced jail time and spent thousands of dollars defending themselves in court and by that time they&#39;d been in jail and on television for being a sex offender interested in child porn. Don&#39;t be a douchebag, use your own IP, whether you were issued it by your ISP or you buy it. If you government or ISP blocks torrents, use a service that condones torrent usage and don&#39;t &quot;chance&quot; screwing someone else&#39;s life up. Torrent &quot;Seedboxes&quot; can still be purchased that will enable you to get all of your torrents faster, anyhow. If you&#39;re too poor to pay for a seedbox or anonymity service, save your money. If not, you&#39;re pretty much a scared human being who I have 0 respect for and if others understand exactly what you&#39;re doing to Tor users, they will see you as a scared little person who doesn&#39;t care if they screw others lives up. I hope that you folks take this into consideration. I know about these technologies because I&#39;ve used them in the past. I don&#39;t condone piracy but if you&#39;re going to do it, don&#39;t give the EFF a bad name and that goes doubly so to the people kind enough to offer their computers, time and bandwidth to tor. Think back to the lady talking about the courts&#39; understanding of technologies and the Internet. Is a judge going to understand that it was one of the people you offer anonymity services to? I&#39;d suggest that those of you who care about your future shut down tor exit nodes that you run, but only because there&#39;s shitty people out there who don&#39;t care if you go to jail because of their actions.</font></font><div>


<font face="verdana, sans-serif"><br></font></div><div><font size="2"></font><font face="verdana, sans-serif"><br></font><div><font size="2"><font face="verdana,sans-serif"><br>

</font></font></div><div><div class="im"><font size="2"><font face="verdana,sans-serif"><br clear="all"></font></font>The information transmitted in this communication is intended only for the person or entity to which it is addressed and may contain confidential and/or privileged information. Any review, retransmission, dissemination, copying or other use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon, this information, or any part thereof, by persons or entities other than the intended recipient, is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you received this in error, please contact the sender immediately and delete and destroy this communication and all copies thereof, including all attachments.<br>



<br><br></div><div><div></div><div class="h5"><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Sep 25, 2010 at 2:17 PM, Ryan Castellucci <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ryan.castellucci@gmail.com" target="_blank">ryan.castellucci@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div>On Fri, Sep 24, 2010 at 7:19 PM, Sai &lt;<a href="mailto:sai@saizai.com" target="_blank">sai@saizai.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
</div><div>&gt; <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-31001_3-20016995-261.html?tag=mncol;5n" target="_blank">http://news.cnet.com/8301-31001_3-20016995-261.html?tag=mncol;5n</a><br>
&gt; <a href="http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=s111-3804" target="_blank">http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=s111-3804</a> (click &#39;full text&#39;)<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; TL;DR: if media company convinces court that a site is for piracy,<br>
&gt; they can get it completely blacklisted by US DNS servers &amp; registrars,<br>
&gt; and blacklisted from any payment systems.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Obvious next steps:<br>
&gt; a) they remove other undesirable things from the &#39;net (e.g. porn,<br>
&gt; pro-pot advocacy, political dissidents, hackers...)<br>
&gt; b) we completely blacklist US-based registrars, DNS servers, &amp; payment systems<br>
<br>
</div>Note: I do not advocate or condone piracy.<br>
<br>
They still don&#39;t understand. They start killing piracy sites? Tor is<br>
not hard to use, the masses are just waiting on a reason to use it. A<br>
Tor hidden service is plenty fast to run a torrent site on, and<br>
extremely difficult to take down. It&#39;s an arms race, and the pirates<br>
can move faster than their corporate and government adversaries.<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
--<br>
Ryan Castellucci <a href="http://ryanc.org/" target="_blank">http://ryanc.org/</a><br>
</font><div><div></div><div>_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net" target="_blank">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div></div></div></div>
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br></div>