<font size="2"><font face="verdana,sans-serif">The day someone makes a darknet into an easy-to-use tool without dumping 2+ gigs of pure crap on your hard drive just to participate as a leeching user it as a requirement and make it a smooth process to install and use, maybe people will start using it. As it stands, it relies upon people willing to store data much like running Tor services. Being part of a small network is like being a park of a tiny private tracker, it can work and it can be infiltrated if it gets bigger. Bigger trackers and file sharing sites draw attention. </font></font><div>

<font size="2"><font face="verdana,sans-serif"><br></font></font></div><div><font size="2"><font face="verdana,sans-serif">No, I don&#39;t really care about line breaks. I don&#39;t plan on re-reading this and my hands hurt from arthritis, so... yeah. And though just like with forums, you&#39;re not responsible for what&#39;s on your hard drive if you don&#39;t know what it is, though if they can prove that you&#39;re on a private darknet that trades only pirated files and you are hosting that and they decrypt it&#39;s up to the judge and legal system, it&#39;s just something we haven&#39;t seen yet. With money and a good lawyer you could probably get off for that, but who knows. You can also be hassled if it&#39;s decrypted enough that while you probably won&#39;t do much jail-time, you will end up having legal fees which is a pain by itself and enough of a deterrent to keep many away. I imagine that darknets will be interesting to watch develop in the future and if something like Direct Connect moves toward better model than it exists currently it might work somewhat well and for many people rather than just a few that are technically savvy and know a group of people willing to invite them in. I guesstimate by 2015 we&#39;ll have anti-piracy laws in the US that&#39;ll be kind of scary like France&#39;s &quot;three strikes&quot; law.</font></font><div>

<font class="Apple-style-span" face="verdana, sans-serif"><br></font></div><div>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Sep 27, 2010 at 11:47 PM, Matt Joyce <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:matt@nycresistor.com">matt@nycresistor.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

<a href="http://www.theonion.com/articles/nation-shudders-at-large-block-of-uninterrupted-te,16932/" target="_blank">http://www.theonion.com/articles/nation-shudders-at-large-block-of-uninterrupted-te,16932/</a><br><br>Also, nothing illegal about darknets.<br>


<br>ChaosVPN has the tinc developers involved and has custom code written by participants.<br><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div><div></div><div class="h5">On Mon, Sep 27, 2010 at 9:42 PM, Ryan Castellucci <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ryan.castellucci@gmail.com" target="_blank">ryan.castellucci@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>


</div></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204);padding-left:1ex"><div><div></div><div class="h5"><div><div></div><div>On Mon, Sep 27, 2010 at 9:33 PM, Thomas Stowe &lt;<a href="mailto:stowe.thomas@gmail.com" target="_blank">stowe.thomas@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>



&gt; There&#39;s a bit of an educated guess that I agree with that Tor is<br>
&gt; compromised. The Navy was doing stuff with it and then there were some<br>
&gt; documents leaked to wikileaks because of an exit-point exploit and I&#39;d<br>
&gt; hazard to guess that anyone after that would&#39;ve used the power of authority<br>
&gt; to cause the EFF and others to put backdoors in their privacy software and<br>
&gt; also full access to source. There are a few softwares like JAP (Jondonym)<br>
&gt; that have been required to put a backdoor in that can be activated with a<br>
&gt; warrant. Given the FBI&#39;s history of illegal wiretaps and overzealous<br>
&gt; behavior of companies hired to track down piracy sites and large groups of<br>
&gt; pirates I&#39;d hazard to guess that Tor, VyprVPN, HideMyAss and everything else<br>
&gt; is compromised. This guess gives me enough pause that I&#39;d suggest that you<br>
&gt; don&#39;t do anything stupid that you&#39;re afraid to get caught doing, ever. If<br>
&gt; you can find a fool-proof anonymity plan, it&#39;s going to be illegal. Almost<br>
&gt; all ways to get high speed Internet access anonymously are illegal and if<br>
&gt; you do something via Tor, they&#39;re essentially going to go after the<br>
&gt; exit-point&#39;s owner which is another Tor user offering anonymity services so<br>
&gt; not only are you doing something stupid but you&#39;re putting the blame on<br>
&gt; someone else for what you did. There&#39;ve been cases of Child Porn<br>
&gt; investigations and raids on innocent people because they were running Tor<br>
&gt; servers who almost faced jail time and spent thousands of dollars defending<br>
&gt; themselves in court and by that time they&#39;d been in jail and on television<br>
&gt; for being a sex offender interested in child porn. Don&#39;t be a douchebag, use<br>
&gt; your own IP, whether you were issued it by your ISP or you buy it. If you<br>
&gt; government or ISP blocks torrents, use a service that condones torrent usage<br>
&gt; and don&#39;t &quot;chance&quot; screwing someone else&#39;s life up. Torrent &quot;Seedboxes&quot; can<br>
&gt; still be purchased that will enable you to get all of your torrents faster,<br>
&gt; anyhow. If you&#39;re too poor to pay for a seedbox or anonymity service, save<br>
&gt; your money. If not, you&#39;re pretty much a scared human being who I have 0<br>
&gt; respect for and if others understand exactly what you&#39;re doing to Tor users,<br>
&gt; they will see you as a scared little person who doesn&#39;t care if they screw<br>
&gt; others lives up. I hope that you folks take this into consideration. I know<br>
&gt; about these technologies because I&#39;ve used them in the past. I don&#39;t condone<br>
&gt; piracy but if you&#39;re going to do it, don&#39;t give the EFF a bad name and that<br>
&gt; goes doubly so to the people kind enough to offer their computers, time and<br>
&gt; bandwidth to tor. Think back to the lady talking about the courts&#39;<br>
&gt; understanding of technologies and the Internet. Is a judge going to<br>
&gt; understand that it was one of the people you offer anonymity services to?<br>
&gt; I&#39;d suggest that those of you who care about your future shut down tor exit<br>
&gt; nodes that you run, but only because there&#39;s shitty people out there who<br>
&gt; don&#39;t care if you go to jail because of their actions.<br>
<br>
</div></div>Ye gods, have ye not heard of line breaks?<br>
<br>
Services can be run internally within tor that don&#39;t have the exit<br>
point weakness<br>
<br>
<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.onion" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.onion</a><br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
--<br>
</font></div></div><div><div></div><div><div><div></div><div class="h5">Ryan Castellucci <a href="http://ryanc.org/" target="_blank">http://ryanc.org/</a><br></div></div><div class="im">
_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net" target="_blank">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
</div></div></div></blockquote></div><br>
</blockquote></div><br></div></div>