<p>Actually I was on a semi pro unreal tournament team years ago.</p>
<p>I remember considerable effort being invested in attempting to statistically verify whether someone was trigger botting or not based upon spread of hits within a hit box.  Several people even began trying to work it into ut comp.</p>

<p>Ut comp was a competition mod that provided functionality necessary for league play.  It removed team color advantages on maps, provided hit detection, better team location... ready ups, more fine control of map win requirements.</p>

<p>Later on several onslaught teams collaborated on levels designed for 3v3 play, as well as an onscomp mod which drastically altered game play to generate an environment amicable to 3v3 matches.  It was very impressive.<br>
</p>
<p>I&#39;ve also seen python written psuedo warcraft and eve online servers.  I saw people in borderlands prop up hacked servers to drop themselves weapons that should never have existed and then carry them onto real servers.</p>

<p>Truth is, there is a lot more to joe lan gamer than pew pew, so in the words of koreans in a zerg rush...  less QQ.</p>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Oct 4, 2010 1:17 PM,  &lt;<a href="mailto:travis%2Bml-noisebridge@subspacefield.org">travis+ml-noisebridge@subspacefield.org</a>&gt; wrote:<br type="attribution">&gt; On Mon, Oct 04, 2010 at 08:06:06PM +0000, Jason Dusek wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt;   I think this is almost right. People should be able to<br>&gt;&gt;   contribute to the game world at a different level if they can<br>&gt;&gt;   program; it lets them do more than mine or fish. However, if<br>&gt;&gt;   it actually lets them &quot;own&quot; then you&#39;ll have a pretty narrow<br>
&gt;&gt;   community on your hands.<br>&gt; <br>&gt; I suppose it depends on how competitive it is, whether it can be fun<br>&gt; to not be at the top, etc.<br>&gt; <br>&gt; I think it&#39;s worth examining, not from the &quot;how can I make the most<br>
&gt; popular game&quot; perspective (there&#39;s many corps doing that), but from<br>&gt; the &quot;how can I make learning fun again&quot; perspective.<br>&gt; <br>&gt; I&#39;d say the number of great weiqi/go/budan players is pretty small,<br>
&gt; too, but that doesn&#39;t make it any less excellent, IMHO.<br>&gt; <br>&gt; I&#39;ve been thinking about this lately, how to make computer security<br>&gt; accessible to more people.  Right now once you get into DEP &amp; ALSR<br>
&gt; and stuff, it just requires so much study before you can contribute...<br>&gt; <br>&gt; Perhaps, like MIX is used to teach assembler, a simpler system could<br>&gt; be used to teach security.<br>&gt; <br>&gt; BTW, I think that the Magic-like trading card games could easily be<br>
&gt; turned onto online games and the complex rules might lend themselves<br>&gt; to interesting programmability options.<br>&gt; <br>&gt; Perhaps a FPS/RPG game could gradually increase in difficulty to the point<br>&gt; where human reflexes aren&#39;t fast enough, and you move to macros and<br>
&gt; eventually programming an agent/avatar and anticipating future events<br>&gt; with code is required.<br>&gt; -- <br>&gt; I find your ideas intriguing and would like to subscribe to your newsletter.<br>&gt; My emails do not have attachments; it&#39;s a digital signature that your mail<br>
&gt; program doesn&#39;t understand. | <a href="http://www.subspacefield.org/~travis/">http://www.subspacefield.org/~travis/</a> <br>&gt; If you are a spammer, please email <a href="mailto:john@subspacefield.org">john@subspacefield.org</a> to get blacklisted.<br>
</div>