On Wed, Oct 13, 2010 at 2:50 PM, Jason Dusek <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jason.dusek@gmail.com">jason.dusek@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">

 
 According to my reading, bridging wifi in Linux is a mess.<br></blockquote></div><br>That&#39;s not a linux issue, that&#39;s a bridging wifi issue.<br><br>Standard ethernet frames have two mac addresses - sender and receiver.<br>

<br>802.11ethernet frames have three mac addresses - station, access point, and &#39;other host&#39;.  The problem here is that there is no way for a station to have multiple ethernet hosts behind it because the hosts behind it will have mac addresses that are not the station address, and thus unreachable.<br>

<br>There are two solutions to this - layer 2 nat (Linux can do this with ebtables) and WDS mode wifi.  In WDS mode wifi, each frame has four addresses, sender, receiver, station, and access point. WDS mode wifi can bridge with normal ethernet without difficulty.<br>

<br>With that little lecture over with, for the purposes of having a logical interface with multiple physical interfaces, bridging the two should work just fine (since you don&#39;t care about forwarding between interfaces).<br clear="all">

<br>-- <br>Ryan Castellucci <a href="http://ryanc.org/">http://ryanc.org/</a><br>