Back when I was a J2EE developer I would use tomcat or JBoss<br>to get started:<br><br><a href="http://tomcat.apache.org/">http://tomcat.apache.org/</a><br><br><a href="http://www.jboss.org/">http://www.jboss.org/</a><br><br>
That was a while ago. For frameworks, people I was around used<br>Spring and Struts:<br><br><a href="http://www.springsource.org/">http://www.springsource.org/</a><br><br><a href="http://struts.apache.org/">http://struts.apache.org/</a><br>
<br>My humble suggestion, not to conflict with William&#39;s, would be<br>learn JSP/Servlets, and understand the web.xml file. Then build<br>your webapp&#39;s .war files and learn how to deploy them. You probably<br>already know this. Ignore EJBs unless you specifically need them<br>
for a job. JDBC is important to know of. JavaServerFaces is something<br>people use I guess too.<br><br>  mike<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Oct 19, 2010 at 11:06 AM, William Sargent <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:will.sargent@gmail.com">will.sargent@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;"><div class="im">  On 10/18/2010 8:53 PM, Gardner wrote:<br>
&gt; Hello,<br>
&gt;   I have a strong command of the Java language and I have recently<br>
&gt; been teaching myself Java EE using NetBeans and GlassFish. I find<br>
&gt; myself getting hung up on simple configuration issues that take me<br>
&gt; hours to resolve. Are there any NoiseBridgers out there that know this<br>
&gt; stuff like the back of their hand? Does anyone want to do an informal<br>
&gt; introductory session?<br>
&gt;<br>
<br>
</div>This is the problem with J2EE -- it&#39;s just a bitch to learn and most of<br>
it is configuration stuff you&#39;ll need to know once after which you&#39;ll<br>
never need it again.<br>
<br>
The good news is that J2EE isn&#39;t one technology.  It&#39;s a bunch of<br>
different libraries glommed together with some marketing.  So while<br>
you&#39;ll need the servlet API, there are several less useful parts of the<br>
spec that you can safely ignore (i.e. JSF, the web framework so useless<br>
it couldn&#39;t even support HTTP GET in its first version.)<br>
<br>
If you want to do something useful with J2EE, probably the first thing<br>
to do is download a working J2EE application and see what you can take<br>
apart.  There is a framework called &quot;AppFuse Light&quot;<br>
(<a href="https://appfuse-light.dev.java.net/" target="_blank">https://appfuse-light.dev.java.net/</a>) which may be a little out of date<br>
(not stared at it recently) but should give you at least an idea of how<br>
the different pieces fit together.<br>
<br>
And... well, you&#39;re not alone.  This is what happened when I first got<br>
to grips with it: <a href="http://tersesystems.com/2005/10" target="_blank">http://tersesystems.com/2005/10</a><br>
<br>
Will.<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br>