Nice paper.  We are taught that people follow incentives.  That&#39;s not wrong, but overemphasized in general and misdirected, creating a false account.  I&#39;m not sure if the political economic model in most legislator&#39;s heads in intentionally naive or unintentionally naive. <br>

<br>An effective law would lead the biggest players to behave badly.  That&#39;s following incentives.  But the law could only come about because powerful interests were innovating less, and feared losing their place to more innovative upstarts.  <br>

<br>When powerful interests begin spending more of their time defending their existing designs than in creating new ones, you should expect to see the rate of innovation decrease.  At least among the big players.  And they will buy up talent and underutilize it.  Kind of like Microsoft....  Good times ahead for the fashion industry.<br clear="all">

<br>Dave<br>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Oct 30, 2010 at 11:41 AM, Sai <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:sai@saizai.com">sai@saizai.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">

May also be interesting:<br>
<br>
The Piracy Paradox: Innovation and Intellectual Property in Fashion Design<br>
<a href="http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=878401" target="_blank">http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=878401</a><br>
<div class="im"><br>
- Sai<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
</div><div><div></div><div class="h5"><a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>