What about using a FPFGA + High Speed AD Converter to make a DIY one?<div><br></div><div>John<br><div><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Nov 7, 2010 at 11:33 PM, Michael Prados <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:mprados@gmail.com">mprados@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">Thanks for taking a look, Erik.  The Bus Pirate does not appear to<br>
support USB, and in any case, the PIC 24F maxes out at 16 MIPS, so it<br>
wouldn&#39;t be capable of interfacing with High Speed USB at 480 Mbit/s.<br>
I&#39;m sure it&#39;s useful for other things, and probably about time I<br>
checked one out.<br>
<br>
I&#39;ve been searching on these and similar terms, and have not been too<br>
satisfied with the results.  Some of the high speed capable USB<br>
analyzer peripherals might be worth the cost, though.  Here is one of<br>
the better comparisons I&#39;ve seen:<br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.summitsoftconsulting.com/UsbAnalyzers.htm" target="_blank">http://www.summitsoftconsulting.com/UsbAnalyzers.htm</a><br>
<br>
They seem pretty fond of this unit, which is a relative bargain at<br>
$500 (compared to some of the $20k options I&#39;ve seen):<br>
<a href="http://www.internationaltestinstruments.com/StoreFront/Store_Prod1_1480A-USB-20-Protocol-Analyzer.aspx" target="_blank">http://www.internationaltestinstruments.com/StoreFront/Store_Prod1_1480A-USB-20-Protocol-Analyzer.aspx</a><br>

<br>
Still not open source.  And none of these seem to tell you anything<br>
about signal integrity, still seems like you have to put some serious<br>
cash into a multi-GHz scope to do any kind of signal integrity work.<br>
<br>
In general, the cost of electronic test equipment goes up with<br>
frequency, so it&#39;s not so surprising that there are so few cheap<br>
solutions.  But on the other hand, USB 2.0 is approaching a decade<br>
old, and is ubiquitous and cheap (via lots of mass produced chips.)  I<br>
think it&#39;s a shame that the debug tools are still a bit inaccessible.<br>
<br>
-Mike<br>
<div><div></div><div class="h5"><br>
<br>
<br>
On Sun, Nov 7, 2010 at 10:40 PM, Erik Nelson &lt;<a href="mailto:erik.nels0n99@gmail.com">erik.nels0n99@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt; I remember it doing USB:<br>
&gt; <a href="http://www.google.com/search?q=bus+pirate" target="_blank">http://www.google.com/search?q=bus+pirate</a><br>
&gt; <a href="http://code.google.com/p/the-bus-pirate/" target="_blank">http://code.google.com/p/the-bus-pirate/</a><br>
&gt; ..Maybe not.<br>
&gt; <a href="http://www.google.com/search?q=open+source+usb+analyzer" target="_blank">http://www.google.com/search?q=open+source+usb+analyzer</a><br>
&gt; Or the latter-<br>
&gt; <a href="http://www.google.com/search?q=open+source+usb+analyzer+protocol" target="_blank">http://www.google.com/search?q=open+source+usb+analyzer+protocol</a><br>
&gt; Hope this is any help at all.<br>
&gt;  -- Erik<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; On Sun, Nov 7, 2010 at 8:47 PM, Michael Prados &lt;<a href="mailto:mprados@gmail.com">mprados@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; PS There are a few devices out there that plug into PC&#39;s to act as<br>
&gt;&gt; signal analyzers, and these solutions are definitely cheaper than<br>
&gt;&gt; traditional self-contained analyzers.  Here are a few of these:<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; <a href="http://www.totalphase.com/solutions/apps/usb_analyzer_guide/?gclid=CJaL-8CjkKUCFQdMgwodikvvMw" target="_blank">http://www.totalphase.com/solutions/apps/usb_analyzer_guide/?gclid=CJaL-8CjkKUCFQdMgwodikvvMw</a><br>

&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; <a href="http://www.lecroy.com/ProtocolAnalyzer/ProtocolOverview.aspx?seriesid=216&amp;capid=103&amp;mid=511&amp;gclid=CJTDkcOjkKUCFQoBbAodqiCIQA" target="_blank">http://www.lecroy.com/ProtocolAnalyzer/ProtocolOverview.aspx?seriesid=216&amp;capid=103&amp;mid=511&amp;gclid=CJTDkcOjkKUCFQoBbAodqiCIQA</a><br>

&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; <a href="http://www.saelig.com/UA/UA016.htm" target="_blank">http://www.saelig.com/UA/UA016.htm</a><br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; <a href="http://myspot.neteze.com/~calfee/" target="_blank">http://myspot.neteze.com/~calfee/</a><br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; These are still a bit pricey, they don&#39;t appear to be open source ,<br>
&gt;&gt; and it doesn&#39;t look like any of them help you with signal integrity<br>
&gt;&gt; issues. Any one use one of these?<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; On Sun, Nov 7, 2010 at 7:19 PM, Michael Prados &lt;<a href="mailto:mprados@gmail.com">mprados@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; Hi All,<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; This has been a topic of increasing interest to me, as USB becomes<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; less of an optional luxury in hardware hacking and more of a<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; necessity, and it&#39;s come up again lately in the context of Adafruit&#39;s<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; bounty for the Kinect:<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; <a href="http://www.adafruit.com/blog/2010/11/05/our-kinect-arrived-today-you-gonna-get-modified/" target="_blank">http://www.adafruit.com/blog/2010/11/05/our-kinect-arrived-today-you-gonna-get-modified/</a><br>

&gt;&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; So many devices that I care to use or build have a USB interface, and<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; there are a lot of tools out there for embedded device developers to<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; add this functionality.  That is all well and good when it just works,<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; but frequently the reality is less than ideal.  Here&#39;s some scenarios<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; I&#39;ve had to deal with:<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; * the interface for a USB device is not, or not fully, documented<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; * the interface for a USB device is nominally documented, but doesn&#39;t<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; perform exactly as the documentation suggests<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; * environmental noise, connector, or transmission line issues lead to<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; signal integrity problems (not to mention PCB design issues!)<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; * you make a working system, set it up somewhere where it is difficult<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; to maintain, and the USB subsystem stops working. How can you diagnose<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; it remotely, or outside of the lab?<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; Traditionally, for signal integrity issues- essentially physical layer<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; issues, you need a high-bandwidth oscilloscope.  I feel like it is not<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; unreasonable for a hacker to get a hold of a 100 MHz scope, which<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; might suffice for Full Speed USB, but for High Speed USB at 480<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; Mbits/sec, you need a scope at up around 2 GHz or above.  Even a used<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; scope in this range typically runs $5k and up.  And heaven forbid you<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; need to debug a problem outside of the lab- are you going to strap<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; your nice scope to the top of a car, or a helium balloon?<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; What I really fantasize about for the physical layer is a<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; self-diagnosing USB hub.  Imagine if your hub could provide even a<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; rough estimate of the eye size.  Has anyone encountered anything like<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; this?<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; So far as the data layer, this is where the USB Analyzer typically<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; comes in.  It seems to cost about the same as the multi-GHz scopes.<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; For this, it really seems like something running on Linux, perhaps<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; with special hardware, could do the trick.  Anyone encounter something<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; like this?  I&#39;ve used Windows based USB monitor software before, but<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; I&#39;ve found this kind of limiting, especially if you can&#39;t run this<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; software on the host device.<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; All too frequently, I end up resorting to RS-232 or RS-485 when I have<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; the choice.  This may still be right decision, even in 2010, but I<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; hate to be forced into it by the inaccessibility of good USB debug<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; tools.  Seems like a major barrier to hardware hacking, which is only<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; going to get worse if a next generation technology such as USB 3.0 or<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; Light Peak gains in popularity.<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; Any one have some good solutions to these problems?  I&#39;ll probably<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; post elsewhere too, but I figured on giving it a try here first.<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; -mike<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; --<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt; [REMOVE THIS TEXT BEFORE SENDING AN EMAIL!]<br>
&gt;&gt; &gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; --<br>
&gt;&gt; [REMOVE THIS TEXT BEFORE SENDING AN EMAIL!]<br>
&gt;&gt; _______________________________________________<br>
&gt;&gt; Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
&gt;&gt; <a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
&gt;&gt; <a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
</div></div>--<br>
<div><div></div><div class="h5">[REMOVE THIS TEXT BEFORE SENDING AN EMAIL!]<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div></div>