<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Nov 30, 2010 at 12:29 PM, Seth David Schoen <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:schoen@loyalty.org">schoen@loyalty.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">

<div class="im"><br>
</div>This might be a bad thing ecologically, but I have wondered whether<br>
someone could make money by arbitraging electricity between utility<br>
customers who are paying different rates.  I haven&#39;t tried to<br>
calculate whether this is plausible, though.</blockquote><div><br>Actually, this was the core of Enron&#39;s business if memory serves me right, and I wouldn&#39;t be surprised if other power companies do this now. Yes - you can make money. FYI, I&#39;ll kick your ass if you get control of a power grid too and then artificially start shortening supply by turning off power plants tho :).<br>

<br>Are futures of US electricity available for public trading though? (I know electric companies can trade power futures with each other...&quot;power futures&quot;...that sounds like something out of a kick ass action flick). If they aren&#39;t, I&#39;m not sure how you could arb this without having control of a distribution grid as well.<br>

<br>Sean<br><br></div></div><br>