First, due to Wikileaks&#39; nature, I believe that in this case, adding a Wikileaks mirror cannot be seen as anything but a political statement -- a vote in favor of WIkileaks, essentially.<div><br></div><div>Second, this is a charged enough environment that this sort of regulation is likely to be interpreted extremely loosely.  </div>
<div><br></div><div>Third, we can&#39;t afford to fight even an egregiously wrong decision on this.</div><div><br></div><div>Again, I think that putting up a Wikileaks mirror is an awesome thing to do, and many Noisebridgers have, but I don&#39;t thing Noisebridge should do so.</div>
<div><br></div><div>--S<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Dec 7, 2010 at 9:59 AM, Sai <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:sai@saizai.com">sai@saizai.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">On Tue, Dec 7, 2010 at 11:50 AM, Shannon Lee &lt;<a href="mailto:shannon@scatter.com">shannon@scatter.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt; Noisebridge itself is, as I understand it, enjoined from making political statements and/or donations, which I am certain this wold be perceived as.<br>
<br>
</div>You are IMO incorrect. The ban applies only to *partisan* political<br>
activity. Julian Assange and Wikileaks in general have no<br>
participation in US elections. E.g. the EFF routinely engages in<br>
political speech, lobbying, issue education, etc - but is<br>
party-neutral.<br>
<br>
Merely mirroring information without actually advocating for anything<br>
is even more neutral.<br>
<br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.irs.gov/charities/charitable/article/0,,id=163395,00.html" target="_blank">http://www.irs.gov/charities/charitable/article/0,,id=163395,00.html</a><br>
<br>
&quot;Under the Internal Revenue Code, all section 501(c)(3) organizations<br>
are absolutely prohibited from directly or indirectly participating<br>
in, or intervening in, any political campaign on behalf of (or in<br>
opposition to) any candidate for elective public office. Contributions<br>
to political campaign funds or public statements of position (verbal<br>
or written) made on behalf of the organization in favor of or in<br>
opposition to any candidate for public office clearly violate the<br>
prohibition against political campaign activity.  Violating this<br>
prohibition may result in denial or revocation of tax-exempt status<br>
and the imposition of certain excise taxes.<br>
<br>
Certain activities or expenditures may not be prohibited depending on<br>
the facts and circumstances.  For example, certain voter education<br>
activities (including presenting public forums and publishing voter<br>
education guides) conducted in a non-partisan manner do not constitute<br>
prohibited political campaign activity. In addition, other activities<br>
intended to encourage people to participate in the electoral process,<br>
such as voter registration and get-out-the-vote drives, would not be<br>
prohibited political campaign activity if conducted in a non-partisan<br>
manner.<br>
<br>
On the other hand, voter education or registration activities with<br>
evidence of bias that (a) would favor one candidate over another; (b)<br>
oppose a candidate in some manner; or (c) have the effect of favoring<br>
a candidate or group of candidates, will constitute prohibited<br>
participation or intervention.&quot;<br>
<br>
See more: <a href="http://www.irs.gov/charities/charitable/article/0,,id=179750,00.html" target="_blank">http://www.irs.gov/charities/charitable/article/0,,id=179750,00.html</a><br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
- Sai<br>
</font></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Shannon Lee<br>(503) 539-3700<br><br>&quot;Any sufficiently analyzed magic is indistinguishable from science.&quot;<br>
</div>