hello, Noisebridge friends,<br><br>It really annoys me to observe this trend in adoption of EagleCAD. Even the hackers working on Open Hardware (as I could confirm during the Open Hardware Summit earlier this year in New York) are using proprietary sw tools to create their PCBs.<br>
<br>As a free software activist, I am concerned about the issue and I would like to better understand it. I&#39;d like to understand what are the specific features that the free sw EDA tools lack nowadays so that I can eventually sit down and code.<br>
<br>But sometimes I feel that perhaps there might not be really a clear and concious reasoning for users adopting Eagle. I mean... perhaps this is just a cultural thing: people using Eagle just because other people are doing so (and sharing eagle files, organizing workshops about it, etc, etc, etc.)<br>
<br>Yesterday I sent a short message about it in response to somebody releasing eagle cad files for one of the OpenDoor Hackaton projects. Somebody else judged that my message was not adequate and that I should do something instead of criticizing other people&#39;s work. (&quot;If you think you can do better, then please do!&quot;) I think that I did not make myself clear by sending just a short, quick message. So that&#39;s why I&#39;m sending this longer explanation of my intentions. It is to make clear that my intentions are not to criticise the work of a specific hacker, but instead to criticise this general culture of adopting proprietary tools in hackerspaces (and/or in open hardware projetcs). And also would like to make it clear that my intentions are indeed to actively &quot;do something better&quot; myself by trying to organize a task force for mapping the current issues in free sw EDA tools and then recruiting a team of hackers to put our hands in actual coding.<br>
<br>I have done something similar for the issue of proprietary architechture&amp;engineering CAD tools (such as AutoCAD) and the result has been the creation of the GNU LibreDWG project ( <a href="http://www.gnu.org/software/libredwg/">http://www.gnu.org/software/libredwg/</a> ). I hope that the experience I got from working on this kind of approach towards software freedom could be useful in the case of massive adoption of EagleCAD too.<br>
<br>Happy Hacking,<br>Felipe &quot;Juca&quot; Sanches<br>Garoa Hacker Clube, São Paulo - Brazil<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Dec 14, 2010 at 1:47 AM, Jonathan Foote <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jtfoote@ieee.org">jtfoote@ieee.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">Last week we went over the basics of EagleCAD, tonight we will see how<br>
far we can get designing a simple board.<br>
7:00 in the couch area, see you there.<br>
<br>
If you missed last week. no worries, you can catch up pretty quickly:<br>
bring a laptop with EagleCAD installed<br>
(details here:  <a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/wiki/EagleCAD_workshop" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/wiki/EagleCAD_workshop</a>) or<br>
just watch how it works on the big screen.<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br>