I upvote this a million times. <div>M<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Dec 23, 2010 at 1:39 PM, Moxie Marlinspike <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:moxie@thoughtcrime.org">moxie@thoughtcrime.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;"><div class="im"><br>
On 12/23/2010 01:09 AM, Jacob Appelbaum wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt; And unfortunately there are things about noisebridge which make hacking<br>
&gt;&gt; the motherfucking planet something you&#39;d rather do somewhere else.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; I think it would be awesome if you would list some of those here. I have<br>
&gt; a really hard time getting upset about someone sleeping on a sofa. what<br>
&gt; is the impact to me programming or reading? Perhaps that I can&#39;t sit on<br>
&gt; the sofa?<br>
<br>
</div>There&#39;s a certain &quot;geography&quot; of a place that defines what is likely or<br>
possible to occur within it.  When you walk into Noisebridge, the<br>
chances are high that you&#39;ll walk into a room of people watching TV on<br>
the projector, playing video games, sleeping on the couches, or<br>
comparing fart noise apps on their iphones.  With a few exceptions,<br>
people don&#39;t go to Noisbridge because they&#39;ve got a great idea, they go<br>
to Noisebridge because they&#39;re bored.  And this defines the geography.<br>
<br>
The world around noisebridge has its own geography: sidewalks are for<br>
walking, stores are for buying things, the BART is for commuting to<br>
work.  The geography of the sidewalk makes it difficult for me to ride a<br>
bike on it, and the geography of a store makes it difficult for me<br>
compose a symphony in it.  Both are totally possible, but there&#39;s<br>
something about the way they&#39;re set up that provides a cultural<br>
resistance to those activities.  And so in many ways the possibilities<br>
of our lives are defined, and the only way to change that is to change<br>
the geography.<br>
<br>
When I see people doing things at Noisebridge that I consider inspiring,<br>
they always appear to be sort of sneaking past the culture of what&#39;s<br>
going on around them.  I&#39;m not talking about a place that&#39;s buzzing with<br>
happening projects along with a single person taking a nap in the<br>
corner, but the inverse.  Ideally I think you&#39;d want the geography of a<br>
hackerspace to encourage inspiring projects, not set up a culture that<br>
offers resistance to them.  If that&#39;s not the case, what&#39;s the<br>
difference between Noisbridge and any other place?<br>
<div class="im"><br>
&gt; I&#39;d love to hear about other issues because some of them are really<br>
&gt; probably something that does impact us all. It would be good to fix<br>
&gt; pressing issues that push you away because you&#39;re part of the reason<br>
&gt; that Noisebridge is such a fucking anarchist mess. You personally. :-)<br>
<br>
</div>I think Noisebridge is a really interesting experiment in public space,<br>
but I&#39;m sorry if I ever somehow gave you the impression that anarchy is<br>
&quot;no rules.&quot;  Anarchy is &quot;no rulers,&quot; which is very different.<br>
Anarchists actually *love* rules.  The &quot;circle a&quot; was Proudhon&#39;s<br>
shorthand for &quot;anarchy is order,&quot; and even the very first anarchist<br>
writings were all about ideas for... rules!<br>
<br>
I mean really, if Noisebridge is an &quot;anarchist space&quot; because it imposes<br>
no rules in addition to the state framework it is surrounded by, does<br>
that mean that Dolores park is an anarchist space too?<br>
<div class="im"><br>
- moxie<br>
<br>
--<br>
<a href="http://www.thoughtcrime.org" target="_blank">http://www.thoughtcrime.org</a><br>
_______________________________________________<br>
</div><div><div></div><div class="h5">Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>doing stuff and making things<br>---<br>&quot;The function of all art ... is an extension of the function of the visual brain, to acquire knowledge; ...artists are, in a sense, neurologists who study the capacities of the visual brain with techniques that are unique to them. .&quot; -Semir Zeki<br>


</div>