<div><br></div><div><br></div>Wrong.  You are limiting the power rather than burning a portion of it off as heat. Yes, there *is* an inegrated resistor, but it&#39;s very low resistance- only enough so the JFET can sense the current (V=IR) and turn off when there&#39;s too much current and turn back on when there&#39;s not enough.  <div>
<br></div><div>It&#39;s a switching power supply with just two leads.<br><div><br></div><div>It&#39;s simpler and easier to use than a resistor (you don&#39;t even have to calculate a value- you just get one that&#39;s got a lower millamp rating than the target LED and make sure the battery voltage exceeds the sum of the voltage in the LED string)</div>
<div><br></div><div>And it&#39;s way more efficient anytime the supply voltage is higher than the the LED voltage.  Like if you want to drive LEDs off 110V AC and a bridge rectifier.  </div><div><br></div><div>Sure, if you happen to match the supply voltage closely to the LEDs, then a resistor is fine.  Like in the LED throwies- a resistor can even be zero.<br>
<br></div><div>But if you want a circuit that works with white and red LEDs, that works when you add more in series, etc., you want current limiting not voltage limiting.</div><div><div><br></div><div>T</div><div><div><div>
<div><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Jan 16, 2011 at 11:27, Jonathan Foote <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jtfoote@ieee.org">jtfoote@ieee.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
As in all engineering solutions, optimizing one variable (efficiency,<br>
say) comes at the cost of another (simplicity).<br>
<br>
A little teaching moment here: there will be a voltage drop V across,<br>
and a current I through, the CLD.<br>
Power = V x I.  How much power is this? Where does it go?<br>
<br>
And how much power would an equivalent resistor use?<br>
<br>
Seeing as how neither the battery voltage nor the load is changing<br>
appreciably, what&#39;s the advantage to using a CLD over a resistor?<br>
<div><div></div><div class="h5"><br>
<br>
<br>
On Sun, Jan 16, 2011 at 10:08 AM, T &lt;<a href="mailto:t@of.net">t@of.net</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Here&#39;s another idea in the thought of not getting overwhelmed by building<br>
&gt; complex circuits.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; You can get a device called a &quot;Constant current diode (also called CLD,<br>
&gt; current limiting diode, constant-current diode, diode-connected transistor<br>
&gt; or CRD,current-regulating diode)&quot;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;  <a href="https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Constant_current_diode" target="_blank">https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Constant_current_diode</a><br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; As long as your battery has a higher voltage than your string of diodes (add<br>
&gt; up the voltage drops if you run them in series as others have advised) and<br>
&gt; is capable of producing the current (milliamps), picking a constant current<br>
&gt; diode that has a current rating at or below the rating of your LEDs should<br>
&gt; do the job in a very simple circuit:<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;  --- - battery + ---- CLD |&gt; ----- LED ---- LED ---- LED .... ---<br>
&gt; |                                                                |<br>
&gt;  ----------------------------------------------------------------<br>
&gt; So something like a 12V camera battery should be able to drive up to 3 white<br>
&gt; 3V LEDs or a few more of the lower-voltage colored variety, a 9V &quot;transistor<br>
&gt; battery&quot; should be able to drive 2.<br>
&gt; And it lends itself to experiment too... you can hood up the battery and the<br>
&gt; CLD and one LED, and it should work fine (since it&#39;s current-limited it will<br>
&gt; limit voltage too), and you can hook up two, and you can hook up three, and<br>
&gt; if you hook up too many they just won&#39;t light up, no harm done.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Best Regards.<br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div></div></div></div></div></div>