I think Patrick is using a broader, and thought-provoking, definition of hacking.<div><br></div><div>You could define the system being hacked as the system for randomly generating reward-bearing scratchcards, and see if there is a systematic flaw in them.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Or - like Patrick - you could define the system being hacked as the system of selling scratchcards, which sometimes pay rewards but often don&#39;t, and generate profits. This system, to some extent, relies on not all rewards being claimed. There is a weakness in this system: if someone highly motivated to find and claim all rewards has access to a supply of scratchcards discarded by those less intelligent or less motivated, then they can &quot;hack&quot; this weakness and make a lot of money.</div>
<div><br></div><div>I find this approach interesting and thought-provoking because by broadening the scope of the system you are trying to hack, you also increase the number of possible hacks. There are plenty of classic examples of this... You can try breaking into a system by technical means, or you can call an employee pretending to be a tech support person, and get them to tell you their password. You can spend a bunch of time picking a lock, or realize that the pane of glass next to it is loose.</div>
<div><br></div><div><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Feb 2, 2011 at 11:41 AM, Sai <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:noisebridge@saizai.com">noisebridge@saizai.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">On Wed, Feb 2, 2011 at 06:07, Patrick Keys &lt;<a href="mailto:citizenkeys@gmail.com">citizenkeys@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt; Dumpster-diving is a very well-recognized form of hacking.<br>
<br>
</div>I disagree. It&#39;s a recognized form of information gathering, which in<br>
turn might be part of a hack (like this one).<br>
<br>
Diving just to find stuff you can sell? That&#39;s being a resourceful<br>
homeless person, sure. It&#39;s not hacking, though, any more than<br>
dumpster-diving for food is.<br>
<div class="im"><br>
&gt; Also, any form of gaming a system for personal benefit, whether its finding<br>
&gt; the algorithm for lottery tickets or where to score free winning tickets,<br>
&gt; generally seems to qualify as hacking.<br>
<br>
</div>Um, actually, no. We&#39;re not trying to do it for personal benefit, and<br>
in fact I would strongly object to that.<br>
<br>
The hacking part is trying to figure out how/if the system is broken,<br>
period, neutral to outcomes.<br>
<br>
What one does with that knowledge is a moral decision. I&#39;m only<br>
willing to participate in this with people who agree that the correct<br>
course of action if a flaw is discovered is responsible disclosure -<br>
test to be sure it&#39;s a real flaw, tell the affected vendors/gov&#39;ts,<br>
give them 30 days to fix, tell the world.<br>
<br>
You seem to have an odd conception of what &quot;hacking&quot; is, from my POV.<br>
<br>
However, Griffin has a good point in that diving may be useful for<br>
finding lots of empties,, which are in turn data that could be fed in<br>
for analysis.<br>
<br>
FWIW I also am inclined to guess that he&#39;s right that any partial<br>
information exposure to make a better &quot;hook&quot; is quite probably done in<br>
a way that leaks entropy. It&#39;s hard to do that kind of working within<br>
constraints well - hard enough that it&#39;s pretty much the foundation of<br>
an entire genre of puzzles (a popular one: sudoku).<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
- Sai<br>
</font><div><div></div><div class="h5">_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>