<p> &quot;Adrian Bankhead&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:invisibleman_24@yahoo.com">invisibleman_24@yahoo.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; So, in the name of &quot;do-ocracy&quot;, we have the ability to ban people even before the group has reached consensus.  And because there is no due process, the banned person can&#39;t defend themselves.  Do I understand this correctly?<br>

&gt;</p>
<p>Thanks for asking! You, and I think many others, do not have it right, in just this way.  We all have the ability to choose how we act towards each other. The letter-signers were a group of individuals present when the evidence was all unveiled together for the first time. As individuals we all together decided to shun a member of the larger community. As individuals we all together command quite a bit of community respect. This is why what we have done seems official. It is our mistake that it seems so official, but I think that is a result of the number of people, the esteem in which their opinions are held, and the level of gravity to which they (we) are assigning the evidence.  We are so convinced that we all stepped up to personally take irrevocable and distasteful action.</p>

<p> (and we do all need to work later on recording our lessons from this experience. Maybe you Alarmed People can write the form letter for Persons Under Consideration of Banning? Then you can help future conflicted souls find the right way to convey to you, dear readers, the proper amounts of distress and authority.)<br>

 <br>
R.</p>