<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
    On 4/9/11 7:05 PM, Mitch Altman wrote:
    <blockquote cite="mid:SNT102-W346938314702595ABE159FB8A90@phx.gbl"
      type="cite">
      <style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 10pt;
font-family:Tahoma
}
--></style>
      This sounds really promising for making 3d scans.&nbsp; Wouldn't it be
      cool to be able to get a 3d scan of something and then print it
      out in a MakerBot?<br>
      &nbsp;<br>
      I took a look at the kinecthacks.com link -- I couldn't find
      out&nbsp;there how it works, or&nbsp;why they call it "RGB-Demo".&nbsp; Is it
      using Red-Green-Blue light to somehow?&nbsp; Or, does "RGB" in this
      case stand for something different?<br>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    There's at least two cameras and 3 modes on there.&nbsp; There's a
    typical RGB output format, just like you'd expect, red, green, blue,
    but there's also an output format where each pixel is represented by
    a "depth" number.&nbsp; I suspect the name RGB-Demo is a play on the
    RGB-D output name.&nbsp; Those output formats seem to be made from a set
    of custom on-board hardware, at least one of which is produced by
    the camera putting out a grid of IR dots and the second (IR) camera
    is using the deformation of those dots to estimate shapes and depth.<br>
    <br>
    Ah, from the wiki page:<br>
    <br>
    <span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate;
      color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: sans-serif; font-size: 16px;
      font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal;
      letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2;
      text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal;
      widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px;"><span class="Apple-style-span"
        style="font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px;">"The depth sensor
        consists of an<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span><a
          href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infrared"
          style="text-decoration: none; color: rgb(6, 69, 173);
          background-image: none;">infrared</a><span
          class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span><a
          href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser"
          style="text-decoration: none; color: rgb(6, 69, 173);
          background-image: none;">laser</a><span
          class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span>projector combined with
        a monochrome<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span><a
          href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Active_pixel_sensor"
          title="Active pixel sensor" style="text-decoration: none;
          color: rgb(6, 69, 173); background-image: none;">CMOS sensor</a>,
        which captures video data in 3D under any<span
          class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span><a
          href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Available_light"
          title="Available light" style="text-decoration: none; color:
          rgb(6, 69, 173); background-image: none;">ambient light</a><span
          class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span>conditions"</span></span><br>
    <br>
    and they call the IR dot field "infrared structured light".&nbsp; The
    company that made the onboard sensor has an open driver kit, but the
    libfreekinect people have figured their own out from the usb
    protocol.<br>
    <br>
    Most annoying for me is that they use a weird USB plug that provides
    12v, and requires either a horrible hack job or at least using the
    AC injector to break it back out to regular 5v USB.&nbsp; <br>
  </body>
</html>