<html><head><style type="text/css"><!-- DIV {margin:0px;} --></style></head><body><div style="font-family:bookman old style,new york,times,serif;font-size:12pt">Hi to all,<br>If I'm out of date, I'm sorry fill me up. But half year ago:<br><br>1) Tastebridge kept the place (kitchen and around) as clean&nbsp; as possible, cleaning before and after classes and it was the main keeper of the kitchen. <br><br>2) Absolute majority of the mess in the kitchen was caused by people who never participated at Tastebridge or very irregularly.<br><br>3) I think that course about food safety is not necessary. Labelling a product with a name of the owner and date when it goes to the fridge should be enough. The rest you can figure by the nose or by quickly checking the Internet. Common sense should do. However if someone would like to do the course I think the same applies as above, talk to non food hacking hackers mostly, I think that they are not the only but the major
 cause of the problem.<br><br>You can always say that because of the food hacking in the place there is equipment, ingredient etc. which allows to the place to become filthy. That is true and I think the direction of culturing the community about food handling is good idea, however it is about on whom to focus.<br><br>4) Cleaning service is great idea, however I do not know how much they would be alright to touch the kitchen, maybe they would be OK to do the floors?<br><br>If I'm out of date about Tastebridge workshops and how they are run, so if there are any changes please fill me up.<br><br>Sincerely,<br><br>Frantisek <br><br><br>&nbsp;<br><div><br></div><div style="font-family:bookman old style, new york, times, serif;font-size:12pt"><br><div style="font-family:times new roman, new york, times, serif;font-size:12pt"><font face="Tahoma" size="2"><hr size="1"><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">From:</span></b> Brian Morris
 &lt;cymraegish@gmail.com&gt;<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">To:</span></b> Will Sargent &lt;will.sargent@gmail.com&gt;<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Cc:</span></b> noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sent:</span></b> Fri, June 17, 2011 2:50:41 AM<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Subject:</span></b> Re: [Noisebridge-discuss] Noisebridge cleaning fund<br></font><br>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Jun 16, 2011 at 12:12 AM, Will Sargent <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a rel="nofollow" ymailto="mailto:will.sargent@gmail.com" target="_blank" href="mailto:will.sargent@gmail.com">will.sargent@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
If you think a cleaning service is going to help decrease the number of flies or food left out, then please chip in. &nbsp;If you think another solution is appropriate for the kitchen, please start another thread (which you can do by changing the subject line) and float ideas.<br>
<br></blockquote><div>I intended to suggest&nbsp; that Cleaning Fund $$ could be used to train FoodBridge participants in the significance of cleaning the kitchen and good practices, which people who have not professional experience may not be familiar with.&nbsp; This would be more effective for the kitchen as it really needs to be done each and every day if not more often and of course that would be costly to hire out. <br>
<br>Another similar option is to pay to have an official&nbsp; NB/FB member to go out for training. I mean like the required food handler course that at least one person from each food service establishment in SF must have taken as required by the law. Of course NB has not required to this as far as I know, but it might probably be sufficient.<br>
<br><br><br></div></div>
</div></div>



</div></body></html>